15th June 2018

Taxonomy

Details / Notes

During the restoration project following the 2014 fire, there was a second fire in The Glasgow School of Art's Mackintosh Building on 15th June 2018. This caused severe damage to the Mackintosh Building and also affected a small number of The Glasgow School of Art's collection items that had remained in the Mackintosh Building for restoration purposes, following the 2014 fire. The majority of the School’s archives and collections had been moved to a new, secure and accessible storage facility at The Whisky Bond and as such were not impacted by the second fire.

Unfortunately, due to their size and fragility, or because they were fixed to the fabric of the building, 29 items from GSA’s collection of plaster casts, as well as a memorial to Sir James Fleming and a metalwork coat of arms, were in the Mackintosh Building at the time of the fire, and were lost.

We have decided to retain descriptions and images of material lost in both the 2014 and 2018 fires on our online catalogue. Although the items no longer exist, their descriptions still provide valuable contextual information for researchers, such as titles, dates, custodial histories, related material etc. The images are also a useful resource, providing vital surrogates for users.

Code

S1506

Scope note(s)

Source note(s)

Hierarchical terms

15th June 2018

Equivalent terms

15th June 2018

Associated terms

15th June 2018

117 Archival description results for 15th June 2018

117 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Carved tablet to Sir James Fleming

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

A carved tribute panel dedicated to Sir James Fleming (Chairman of GSA's Board of Governors). Located on the half landing between the ground and first floors of the Mackintosh Building. Panel unveiled, 17 January 1903.

Frampton, Sir George James

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 1)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 2)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 3)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 4)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 5)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 6)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 7)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 8)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Plaster cast of Apollo Sauroctonos (Lizard Slayer)

  • PC/006
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: This cast is of a 1st - 2nd century AD Roman marble copy of the Praxiteles original (Bronze, attributed by Pliny). It shows a nude adolescent male about to catch a lizard climbing up a tree. The left arm, the right hand and the lizard's head are modern restorations. It could indirectly refer to Apollo's fight against the serpent Python or, if the lizard is an attribute of the god, it could show Apollo in his purifying function, as a destroyer of plagues. Original currently in the collection of the Louvre, Paris, France.

Plaster cast of Apoxyomenos (Vatican Apoxyomenos)

  • PC/002
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: An athlete, caught in the familiar act of scraping sweat and dust from his body with the small curved instrument that the Romans called a strigil. This cast is of the legs of the cast only. Original currently in the collection of the Museo Pio-Clementino in the Vatican, Rome, Italy.

Plaster cast of Augustus of Primaporta

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: Statue of Augustus Caesar which was discovered on April 20, 1863, in the Villa of Livia at Prima Porta, near Rome. Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus (23 Sep 63BC-19 Aug AD14) was the first ruler of the Roman Empire, which he ruled alone from January 27BC until his death in AD14. Original currently in the collection of the Braccio Nuovo of the Vatican, Rome, Italy.

Plaster cast of baptismal font

  • PC/214
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Gilt plaster circular font. Damage sustained when student put water into the cast.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Borghese Warrior

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: Also known as: Discobolus, Fighting Gladiator, Hector, Heros Combattant, Borghese Gladiator. Particularly admired for its truthful rendering of anatomy. A Hellenistic sculpture actually portraying a swordsman, created at Ephesus about 100 BCE. Listed in first catalogue of casts as Greek, in the Louvre and was bought from Brucciani. Original currently in the collection of the Louvre, Paris, France.

Plaster cast of Boy of Subiaco

  • PC/021
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: From the group of Niobe and her children at the Galleria Uffizi, Florence, Italy, originally found in Rome in 1583. Niobe boasted about her 14 children (the Niobids) to Leto, mother to only Artemis and Apollo. Leto demanded her children take revenge upon Niobe's hubris. Using arrows, Artemis killed Niobe's daughters and Apollo killed Niobe's sons. This cast shows one son cowering from the onslaught.

Plaster cast of Canephora (Kanephoros)

  • PC/007
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: Canephora was an honorific office given to unmarried young women in ancient Greece which involved the privilege of leading the procession to sacrifice at festivals.Translated as: "Basket Bearer". Original currently in the collection of the British Museum, London, UK.

Plaster cast of Charioteer of Delphi

  • PC/008
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: The life-size bronze statue of a chariot driver was found in 1896 at the Sanctuary of Apollo in Delphi and is also known as Heniokhos, the rein-holder. The statue was erected at Delphi in 474BC, to commemorate the victory of a chariot team in the Pythean Games, which were held at Delphi every four years in honor of Pythean Apollo. Original currently in the collection of the Delphi Archaeological Museum, Greece.

Plaster cast of Crouching Discobolos

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: The Discobolus of Myron is a famous lost Greek bronze original that was completed towards the end of the Severe period, c460-450 BC. It is known through numerous Roman copies, both full-scale ones in marble, such as the first to be recovered, the Palombara Discobolus, or smaller scaled versions in bronze. Bought from Brucciani. Original currently in the collection of the British Museum, London, UK.

Plaster cast of Dione and Aphrodite (From Hestia, Dione and Aphrodite)

  • PC/017
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: Figures from the east pediment of the Parthenon depicting the birth of Athena. The Acropolis, Athens, Greece, about 438-432 BC. The two figures are thought to be Dione cradling her daughter Aphrodite; they are remarkable for their naturalistic rendering of anatomy blended with a harmonious representation of complex draperies. However, another suggestion is that the two figures on the right are the personification of the Sea (Thalassa) in the lap of the Earth (Gaia). Original currently in the collection of the British Museum, London, UK.

Plaster cast of Germanicus (Marcellus)

  • PC/011B
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: The original scaled Roman statue of c50BC by the sculptor Kleomenes. The Nude male statue, erroneously identified as Germanicus, a member of the family of the Emperor Augustus, probably should be considered a portrait of a member of a wealthy family of the late Republic. Original currently in the collection of the Louvre, Paris, France.

Plaster cast of Germanicus (Marcellus)

  • PC/011A
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: The original scaled Roman statue of c50BC by the sculptor Kleomenes. The Nude male statue, erroneously identified as Germanicus, a member of the family of the Emperor Augustus, probably should be considered a portrait of a member of a wealthy family of the late Republic. Original currently in the collection of the Louvre, Paris, France.

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