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Glasgow style With digital objects
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Photograph Album containing photographs of "The Immortals"- Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Margaret and Frances Macdonald, Herbert MacNair, Jessie Keppie and others (Part 4 - Version 1)

Back Row: Frances Macdonald
Middle Row L-R: Margaret Macdonald, Katherine Cameron, Janet Aitken, Agnes Raeburn, Jessie Keppie, John Keppie
Front Row L-R: Herbert MacNair, Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Not available / given

Chair for Oak Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).
Designed for the Oak Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. The wavy top rail and twin back rails echo the bent laths fitted to the Oak Room balcony and also used on the dresser. All chairs repaired and re-rushed 1985. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Chinese Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010). Designed for the Blue or Chinese Room at the Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. The fretted back and side rails match the Chinese style motifs of the Blue Room (as called in the job books). Much of the woodwork in the Chinese Room was painted bright blue or red, but there is no trace of any finish having been applied to these chairs other than the ebonising which most of them still display. These chairs have always been associated with the Chinese Room and so must be identified with the entry for thirty-six in the job books (Roger Billcliffe). All the chairs rwere eupholstered in blue horsehair in 1985. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 2)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 3)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Fairies

Mackintosh's style here is the closest he came to that of Margaret and Frances Macdonald, but his figures are always more substantial and the subject matter less whimsical than theirs.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Village, Worth Matravers

In July Mackintosh and Margaret Macdonald spent a holiday in Dorset re-visiting many of the place he had visited in 1895. 'In 'The Village' and 'The Downs' Mackintosh makes his first conscious moves towards his mature style of the Port Vendres period. He is obviously concerned with the pattern of the landscape, picking out features like the stepped hillside, the stone walls, paths and roofs of village houses. These ordinary motifs are given an eerie emphasis by being painted in an equally detailed manner whether they are in the foreground of the the distance... it was probably at this time... that he decided to concentrate more and more on painting. By 1923 he had decided to forsake architecture and design and devote the rest of his life to producing watercolours.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 6 View from North-West from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.Muthesius in his introduction to the 'Meister der Innen Kunst' portfolio, stresses the impact and novelty of Mackintosh's design. 'The exterior architecture of the building... exhibits an absolutely original character, unlike anything else known... The mass of the building consists of a large plain black, without any breaking up of the walls, the effect being sought for in unbroken uniform surfaces... the windows have the appearance of accidental openings deeply recessed in the walls... Ornament, save in two or three places, is conspicuously absent, all allurements being sternly repressed in order that the desired effect of plainness reticence and therewithal of mystery and height, might be revealed as strongly as possible.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 7 Reception Room and Music Room from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.One of the three interior perspectives which Mackintosh omitted from his original submission and consequently was disqualified from the competition, but later supplied to the publishers. They differ in some detail from the elevations already submitted, the arrangements of the lighting is simpler, the stencilled panels at the window are more elaborate and positioned within the recess, next to the windows, rather than on the walls between each recess. The perpendicular stress of the two rows of tapering square standard down each wall is reinforced by the extremely high backs of the chairs and the original light fittings, 'four small square lanterns, each hanging by four cords, so that the whole effect is of a forest of perpendiculars' (Muthesius). As in the dining room it is evident that (probably because of lack of time) Mackintosh drew on furniture designs he had already used in Glasgow: the high backed chairs are very similar to those designed for the Ingram Street Tea Rooms. The most prominent feature of the room is the piano.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 14 The Dining Room from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection. Like the hall, this room is wood panelled. The sombreness of the dark panelling is relieved by a frieze of coloured panels using the standard Mackintosh theme of a stylised female figure, and the coloured lights handing from the barrel vaulted ceiling. As in the reception room, Mackintosh makes use of furniture designs he has already used elsewhere, the stone surround of the fireplace is based on that in the original Board Room in the GSA, the table (the flat, plank like surfaces echoing the construction of the sideboard) on the dining table designed for Windyhill, and the chairs recall the oval backrail armchairs used in the Mains Street dining room. The central feature of the room is the fireplace, set in a deep recess decorated with fanciful female figures, details picked out in rose against a strong blue ground which dominates the otherwise severe room. The colours are echoed in the wall panels, the decorative insets on the sideboard, the china and even the table runner and roses on the table.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Design for the Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow

Design for the staircase and vestibule, West Elevation, The Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. Miss Cranston and her husband Major Cochrane commissioned Mackintosh to redesign the interiors of their home Hous'hill at Nitshill. Mackintosh designed several suites of furniture in 1904 and more pieces in 1909. Stripes are the dominant motif in the decorations, in the panels over the settle and between the doors where they are carried over the ceiling as in the guest bedroom at 78 Derngate. The lampshades are also similar to those used in this bedroom. (Roger Billcliffe). The lattice work recalls the hall at Derngate, but here it is used as an open screen rather than with solid or glazed panels. The only furniture that has been traced is the chair at the writing desk and the small table.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

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