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The Glasgow School of Art
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Collection of 31 pottery fragments

Group of 31 glazed and gilded pottery fragments from Persia/Egypt/Syria. Includes imagery of ornamental designs, figures, animals, and Arabic/Cufic lettering. May have been collected and given to the school by William Matthew Flinders Petrie in the early 20th century. Likely brought to the Glasgow School of Art to be used as teaching aids.

12) 3 glazed and hand-painted fragments.

a) (NMC/1633V) Slightly curved fragment with blue glaze and dark green hand-painted design and bands on recto. Blue glaze with dark green hand-painted Arabic writing and a green band on verso.

b) (NMC/1633W) Small fragment with cream glaze and gold hand-painted face on recto. Blue glaze with faint green hand-painted pattern on verso.

c) (NMC/1633X) Slightly curved fragment with pastel blue glaze on recto and verso.

13) 2 glazed and hand-painted fragments.

a) (NMC/1633Y) Rim fragment with cream glaze and blue, turquoise, red, and dark brown hand-painted patterns on recto. '15 SAVEH' and '15' handwritten on verso. Saveh is a city in Iran.

b) (NMC/1633Z) Rim fragment with green/brown glaze with dark blue hand-painted desgin on recto. Dark blue glaze on verso.

14) 4 small glazed and hand-painted fragments

a) (NMC/1633AA) Rim fragment with cream glaze and blue and black hand-painted band on recto. Cream glaze with hand-painted black band with what might be Arabic writing on verso.

b) (NMC/1633BB) Small fragment with raised blue hand-painted pattern. 'SAVEH 11' handwritten on verso. Saveh is a city in Iran.

c) (NMC/1633CC) Small rim fragment with cream glaze, blue and red hand-painted design, and pale blue band on recto. Small area of a blue band on verso.

d) (NMC/1633DD) Triangluar shaped mosaic/arrow tile. Blue, red, and white hand-painted pattern on recto.

15) (NMC/1633EE)Turquoise glazed fragment from possibly a dish or bowl with a handle. A face is hand-painted in black on the handle. Figures and designs hand-painted in black, brown, beige and red with gold leaf on the inside. Black pattern hand-painted on the outer edge.

Not available / given

Paisley Shawl Designs II

  • DC 080
  • Collection
  • 1840s-1850s

A collection of 6 mounted boards with hand-drawn, hand-painted designs for shawls, featuring the Kashmir cypress cone or 'Paisley' pattern.

Paisley Shawl Designs

  • DC 039
  • Collection
  • 1840s-1850s

A collection of 27 mounted boards with hand-drawn designs for shawls, featuring the Kashmir cypress cone or 'Paisley' pattern.

Mackie, Thomas Callendar Campbell

Glasgow School of Art and Haldane Academy medal

Bust of Haldane (obverse); figure of Minerva (reverse). Awarded to Catherine C. Peacock, Stage 17A. The GSA was known as the Glasgow School of Art and Haldane Academy from 1869-1892. Inscribed: "Glasgow School of Art and Haldane Academy Awarded by the Haldane Trustees (with figure of Minerva) Catherine C. Peacock, Stage 17A, 1870".

Not available / given

Glasgow School of Art and Haldane Academy medal

Bust of Haldane? (obverse): figure of Minerva (reverse). Awarded to Charles Eadie. Stage 19B. The GSA was known as the Glasgow School of Art and Haldane Academy from 1869-1892. Inscribed obverse: "Glasgow School of Art and Haldane Academy"; On rim: "Charles Eadie Stage 19B".

Not available / given

Photograph and key to photograph of The Glasgow School of Art staff at Tarbet

Large wooden framed black and white photograph of 15 men, staff and Board members of The Glasgow School of Art, in the grounds of Tarbet Hotel Loch Lomond.  Label at foot of frame reads, "presented by J Arnold Fleming OBE."  Annan and Sons photographers label on verso.  Smaller wooden framed diagrammatic key to photograph of an outing of The Glasgow School of Art staff to Tarbet Hotel, Loch Lomond in 1890. Both behind glass.

T & R Annan & Sons Ltd

Italian Sketchbook

This sketchbook consists of 81 pages of sketches made by Charles Rennie Mackintosh during his trip to Italy in 1891 funded by his Greek Thomson travelling scholarship prize money. The subjects he sketched are mainly architectural, with the one he felt to be most impressive being labelled 'A Caution'. Each sketch is labelled with the name of the city or town in which it was sketched. In 1890 Mackintosh won the Alexander 'Greek' Thomson Travelling Scholarship with a design for a public hall, which enabled him to take an extensive tour abroad from February to July 1891. He left Glasgow for London on 21 March 1891, sailing from Tilbury on the Thames on 27 March and arriving in Naples on 5 April. He then visited Palermo in Sicily, Rome, Orvieto, Siena, Florence, Pisa, Pistoia, Bologna, Ravenna, Ferrara, Venice, Padua, and Vicenza, arriving in Verona on 10 June 1891. The Sketchbook contains drawings from the later part of Mackintosh's tour, from 10th June, with sketches, mostly of architectural and sculptural details, beginning with Verona. It covers Verona (11-14 June); Mantua (14 June); Cremona (14-15 June); Brescia (16 June); Bergamo (17 June); Lecco (18 June); Cadenabbia and Lake Como (19-25 June); Como (26-27 June); Milan (28 June-6 July); Pavia (7 July-?); Certosa di Pavia (probably several days around 12 July); Paris and Chateau d'Ecouen (late July?); Antwerp (late July? - briefly visited on his return journey). It also contains several pages of designs for the Glasgow Art Club (1892-3) and the Glasgow Herald Building (1893-5). The drawings themselves are almost all pencil sketches, some of which are now quite faint.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Descent of Night

Appears in The Magazine, April 1894. 'The central figure is based upon that used in the 1893 design for a diploma for the GSA and like that in 'The Harvest Moon', has wings like an angel. Here, however, she appears naked and her outstretched arms and hair merge and are transformed into barren tree-like forms. These descend to the horizon behind which the sun is gradually disappearing under the feet of the winged figure. From the bottom of the picture, and directly beneath the sun, rises a flight of menacing birds. They are presumably nocturnal birds of prey and they seem to be flying directly towards the viewers. This is one of Mackintosh's earliest uses of this strange bird, which was to become more stylised and to appear in many different forms, in several media in his oeuvre.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Autumn

Bound in volume, The Magazine, November 1894. 'Behind a stylised tree stands another of Mackintosh's mysterious female figures, but this is the first one to appear that is not meticulously drawn. Only the head is shown in any detail, and the shape of the body is hidden by a voluminous cloak from which not even its limbs appear. This figure was to be repeated many times, becoming more and more stereotyped until, with the banners designed for the Turin Exhibition in 1902, the head is the only recognisably human part of a figure with a twelve-foot long, pear shaped torso. In 1895-96, Mackintosh was to develop this drawing into a poster for the Scottish Musical Review (Howarth, p1, 9F). The same cloaked figure appears with similar formal emblems at the ends of the branches of the bush.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

A Pond

Bound in the November 1894 edition of 'The Magazine'. "It must have been something like this watercolour.... that evoked the 'critics from foreign parts' (as reported by Gleeson White in The Studio, pp88-9) to deduce 'the personality of the Misses MacDonald from their works' and see them as 'middle-ages sisters, flat footed, with projecting teeth and long past matrimony... gaunt, unlovely females'. Gleeson White who visited Glasgow to see the Mackintosh group was pleasantly surprised to meet two laughing comely girls scarce out of their teens." (MacLaren Young).

MacNair, Frances Macdonald

Cabbages in an Orchard

From The Magazine, April 1894. The long text by Mackintosh which accompanies this watercolour in The Magazine (reproduced in full in Billcliffe's catalogue) suggests that he had already encountered public hostility to his work, possibly even from fellow students, on the grounds of incomprehensibility.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Tree of Personal Effort

From The Magazine, Spring 1896. Inscribed: The Tree of Personal Effort, The Sun of Indifference, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, January 1895.' The exact meaning of the symbolism of this work, and its companion, 'The Tree of Influence' has eluded all commentators on Mackintosh's early water-colours. The obvious source of the symbolism is nature, and Mackintosh here reaches his most extreme distortion of organic forms.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Magazine

There are 4 known surviving volumes: The Magazine 1893, The Magazine April 1894, The Magazine November 1894, The Magazine 1896.

The Magazine was a publication of original writings and designs by students from the Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland, and their friends. Appearing in 4 volumes between November 1893 and Spring 1896, The Magazine contains text from contributors handwritten by Lucy Raeburn, editor, accompanied by original illustrations. These volumes are the only known copies of The Magazine. In addition to rare, early watercolours and designs by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the volumes contain early designs by Frances MacDonald and Margaret MacDonald, at a stage in their development which has been labelled 'Spook School', and two sets of photographs by James Craig Annan, when he was beginning to establish a reputation at home and abroad. Among other contributors were Janet Aitken, Katherine Cameron, Agnes Raeburn and Jessie Keppie, all of whom enjoyed lengthy careers in art and design.

The Magazine is similar to an album amicorum such as those which originated in the middle of the 16th century among German university students, who collected autographs of their friends and notable persons, sometimes adding coats of arms and illustrations. The Magazine resembled the album amicorum in that contributions were by a close group of students and their friends and is all the more interesting because the illustrations were produced by young people who had a common social background, were trained at the same school, and subjected to the same artistic influences. The contributors were closely linked, some by family, some by romantic attachments and had close social connections. Other contributors include C Kelpie, John M Wilson, Jane Keppie, and Ethel M Goodrich. Source: Jude Burkhauser, Glasgow Girls: women in art and design (Edinburgh : Canongate, 1990) The Magazine has been digitised in its entirety, and is available to search and browse at www.gsathemagazine.net/

Raeburn, Lucy

The Duncan Brown Photographic Collection

  • DB
  • Collection
  • 1853-1896

The collection consists of 305 photographs taken between 1853 and 1896. Sitters included local dignitaries, friends and family including John Brown, Queen Victoria's Ghillie. The collection also includes landscapes and the streets of Glasgow, particularly around the Pollokshields area on the south side of the city. Other subjects include ships, ship yards and stately houses.

Brown, Duncan

Silver plummet, gift to James Fleming

Inscribed silver (Glasgow hallmark) plummet in wooden presentation tray.  Inscription reads: 'This plummet was presented to James Fleming, Chairman of Governors by John Morrison: Wright, on the occasion of the laying of the memorial stone of the Glasgow School of Art, May 25 1898.'

R & W Sorley, Glasgow

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 1)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 7)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

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