Item MC/A/1A - Embroidered panel

Key Information

Reference code

MC/A/1A

Title

Embroidered panel

Date(s)

  • c1902-1904 (Creation)

Level of description

Item

Extent

1 of 2

Content and Structure

Scope and content

Similar panels appear in Mackintosh's drawings of the east wall of the principal bedroom at The Hill House although it is not certain when they were installed there as early photographs taken in 1904 do not show them. The panels appear to be duplicates of those shown at the Vienna Secession exhibition in 1900 and bought by Emil Blumenfelt; at least one of these (listed as a 'bed curtain') was lent by Blumenfelt to the Turin exhibition in 1902 - although it lacks the lower section of black silk seen on The Hill House panels.

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General Information

Name of creator

(1864-1933)

Biographical history

Margaret Macdonald was one of the most gifted and successful women artists in Scotland at the turn of the century. Her output was wide-ranging and included watercolours, graphics, metalwork and textiles. Arguably her greatest achievements were in gesso, a plaster-based medium, which she used to make decorative panels for furniture and interiors. Macdonald was born in England and came to Glasgow with her family around 1890. She enrolled as a day student at Glasgow School of Art where she met Mackintosh and Herbert McNair. She left the School in the mid 1890s and set up an independent studio in the city with her sister, Frances. Margaret Macdonald The sisters worked together until Frances’s marriage and departure for Liverpool in 1899. Mackintosh and Macdonald married in 1900. Collaboration was key to Margaret Macdonald’s creativity. The partnership with her sister in the 1890s produced metalwork, graphics, and a series of book illustrations. Her collaboration with Mackintosh comprised primarily the production of panels for interiors and furniture, notably for the tea rooms and The Hill House. The precise nature of their partnership is difficult to define, because little documentation survives. However it is certain that Macdonald played an important role in the development of the decorative, symbolic interiors of the early 1900s, including the House for an Art Lover portfolio, the Rose Boudoir, Turin and the Willow Tea Rooms. Ill health and the strain of Mackintosh’s declining career contributed to a decline in her own output and no work after 1921 is known. Macdonald died in London in 1933, five years after her husband.

Archival history

06 October 2017 - 21 January 2018, exhibited as part of 'William Morris and Company: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Great Britain', Fundación Juan March, Madrid.

22 February 2018 - 21 May 2018, exhibited as part of 'William Morris and Company: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Great Britain', Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, Barcelona

Custodial history

William G Blackie, by whom presented, in 1953.

Physical Description and Conditions of Use

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Physical Description

Linen embroidered with silk and metal threads in satin stitch and couching with silk braid, ribbon, silk appliqué, glass beads, square linen buttons painted gold. The faces are painted in watercolour on white kid stretched over card

Dimensions: 1772 x 410 mm

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Administrative Information

Description identifier

GB 1694 MC/A/1A

Institution identifier

GB 1694

Rules and/or conventions used

ISAD(G): General International Standard Archival Description - Second edition

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