Item MC/A/19 - Design for a Glasgow School of Art Club 'Programme'

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Key Information

Reference code

MC/A/19

Title

Design for a Glasgow School of Art Club 'Programme'

Date(s)

  • 1893 (Creation)

Level of description

Item

Extent

1

Content and Structure

Scope and content

Featuring two seated, semi-clothed female figures integrated amongst swirling plant forms.

Appraisal, destruction and scheduling

Accruals

System of arrangement

General Information

Name of creator

(1864-1933)

Biographical history

Margaret Macdonald was one of the most gifted and successful women artists in Scotland at the turn of the century. Her output was wide-ranging and included watercolours, graphics, metalwork and textiles. Arguably her greatest achievements were in gesso, a plaster-based medium, which she used to make decorative panels for furniture and interiors. Macdonald was born in England and came to Glasgow with her family around 1890. She enrolled as a day student at Glasgow School of Art where she met Mackintosh and Herbert McNair. She left the School in the mid 1890s and set up an independent studio in the city with her sister, Frances. Margaret Macdonald The sisters worked together until Frances’s marriage and departure for Liverpool in 1899. Mackintosh and Macdonald married in 1900. Collaboration was key to Margaret Macdonald’s creativity. The partnership with her sister in the 1890s produced metalwork, graphics, and a series of book illustrations. Her collaboration with Mackintosh comprised primarily the production of panels for interiors and furniture, notably for the tea rooms and The Hill House. The precise nature of their partnership is difficult to define, because little documentation survives. However it is certain that Macdonald played an important role in the development of the decorative, symbolic interiors of the early 1900s, including the House for an Art Lover portfolio, the Rose Boudoir, Turin and the Willow Tea Rooms. Ill health and the strain of Mackintosh’s declining career contributed to a decline in her own output and no work after 1921 is known. Macdonald died in London in 1933, five years after her husband.

Archival history

Invitation for a social event held in the Institute of Fine Art Galleries, Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow

Custodial history

Physical Description and Conditions of Use

Conditions governing access

Conditions governing reproduction

Language of material

Script of material

Language and script notes

Physical Description

Lithograph; green ink on white paper. Inscribed: Margt. Memps Macdonald Inv. E Delt. (b.l.)

Dimensions: 132 x 152 mm

Finding aids

Related Material

Existence and location of originals

Existence and location of copies

Related materials

McKenzie, 'The Flower and the Green Leaf', 2009; p.98

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Alternative identifier(s)

Keywords/Tags

Place access points

People and Organisations

Genre access points

Administrative Information

Description identifier

GB 1694 MC/A/19

Institution identifier

GB 1694

Rules and/or conventions used

ISAD(G): General International Standard Archival Description - Second edition

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