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Interior design With digital objects
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Design for The Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow

Design for the Restroom, North Elevation, Willow Tea Rooms, Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. Stripes are the dominant motif in the decorations, in the panels over the settle and between the doors where they are carried over the ceiling as in the guest bedroom at 78 Derngate. The lampshades are also similar to those used in this bedroom. (Roger Billcliffe). The lattice work recalls the hall at Derngate, but here it is used as an open screen rather than with solid or glazed panels. The only furniture that has been traced is the chair at the writing desk and the small table.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 12 The Hall from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.This drawing shows the construction of the gallery which connects the East and West portions of the house, resting on wooden cased pillars. In the upper portion of the pillars the dark woodwork is relieved by silver decorative panels, a painted frieze running between them. Similarly the double doors are relieved by panels of coloured glass, and coloured panels are inset above the fireplace. Through the doors one entered the reception/music rooms, their white walls and elegant decoration forming a brilliant contrast to the dark hall. Two features are reminiscent of earlier projects: the balcony with the pendant panels echoes the gallery at Queen's Cross Church, and the silver panels in the supporting posts recall those used beside the large gesso panels at Ingram St in 1900.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 14 The Dining Room from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection. Like the hall, this room is wood panelled. The sombreness of the dark panelling is relieved by a frieze of coloured panels using the standard Mackintosh theme of a stylised female figure, and the coloured lights handing from the barrel vaulted ceiling. As in the reception room, Mackintosh makes use of furniture designs he has already used elsewhere, the stone surround of the fireplace is based on that in the original Board Room in the GSA, the table (the flat, plank like surfaces echoing the construction of the sideboard) on the dining table designed for Windyhill, and the chairs recall the oval backrail armchairs used in the Mains Street dining room. The central feature of the room is the fireplace, set in a deep recess decorated with fanciful female figures, details picked out in rose against a strong blue ground which dominates the otherwise severe room. The colours are echoed in the wall panels, the decorative insets on the sideboard, the china and even the table runner and roses on the table.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 13 The Dining Room Sideboard from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.In his perspective drawing of the dining room, Mackintosh altered the detailing of the sideboard.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 10 The Nursery from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection. One of the three perspectives submitted by Mackintosh after the competition had been judged. The fitted furniture, benches and table are all loosely based on those designed for William Davidson's house Windyhill. Interesting features are the lighting standards with their tree like arrangement of lamps and the gesso panel over the fireplace, possibly depicting an episode from the Sleeping Beauty Story, credited to Margaret Macdonald. (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 7 Reception Room and Music Room from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.One of the three interior perspectives which Mackintosh omitted from his original submission and consequently was disqualified from the competition, but later supplied to the publishers. They differ in some detail from the elevations already submitted, the arrangements of the lighting is simpler, the stencilled panels at the window are more elaborate and positioned within the recess, next to the windows, rather than on the walls between each recess. The perpendicular stress of the two rows of tapering square standard down each wall is reinforced by the extremely high backs of the chairs and the original light fittings, 'four small square lanterns, each hanging by four cords, so that the whole effect is of a forest of perpendiculars' (Muthesius). As in the dining room it is evident that (probably because of lack of time) Mackintosh drew on furniture designs he had already used in Glasgow: the high backed chairs are very similar to those designed for the Ingram Street Tea Rooms. The most prominent feature of the room is the piano.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 8 Reception Room from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection. One of the three interior perspectives which Mackintosh omitted from his original submission and consequently was disqualified from the competition, but later supplied to the publishers. They differ in some detail from the elevations already submitted, the arrangements of the lighting is simpler, the stencilled panels at the window are more elaborate and positioned within the recess, next to the windows, rather than on the walls between each recess. The perpendicular stress of the two rows of tapering square standard down each wall is reinforced by the extremely high backs of the chairs and the original light fittings, 'four small square lanterns, each hangings by four cords, so that the whole effect is of a forest of perpendiculars' (Muthesius). As in the dining room it is evident that (probably because of lack of time) Mackintosh drew on furniture designs he had already used in Glasgow: the high backed chairs are very similar to those designed for the Ingram Street Tea Rooms. The most prominent feature of the room is the piano. Muthesius comments on the frequent juxtaposition in the work of the Glasgow School of 'masculine' hard perpendicular structural lines and 'feminine' flowing decorative curves, exemplified in this design. 'Straight lines, especially perpendicular ones, are exalted into a principle, and are carried so far as to be almost spiritualised... Any outbreak of softness is scourged off the field by an exotic multiplication of perpendiculars...This masculine art... also has a feminine side... seen in the panels... which, appearing in a stiff architectural framing, mark an interesting reaction in the direction of sublimated effeminacy...The human figure appears to be regarded as material merely for indulging a taste for soft flowing lines. At need it is impossibly lengthened out or otherwise altered... it is cramped into all sorts of strange positions in order to help out a required note in the decoration.'

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 9 Music Room with Piano & Fireplace from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection. When the dividing partition between the reception and music rooms was removed, these two elevations would have faced each other. The piano with its fantastic superstructure, is on of Mackintosh's most elaborate inventions, based on the organ at Craigie Hall (Roger Billcliffe). 'This instrument is before everything else a piece of decorative art, and is designed to match the rest of the room... four tall corner posts, crowned with groups of figures and reaching to the ceiling, form a sort of baldachin round it. The front is composed of an oval framework containing a tall thin female figure flanked by roses, with a pair of doves meeting overhead. This fanciful composition is supported artistically by two large decorative panels on the walls on either side of the piano, representing two highly spiritualised Astarte-like figures.' (Muthesius). The large projecting fireplace on the opposite wall is a more elaborate version of that in the Mains Street drawing room. Its decoration consists principally of a pair of tall upright candelabra; the inlaid panels above are by Margaret Macdonald.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 11 The Bedroom from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection. The only design for the bedroom, this elevation shows the furniture arranged along one wall, a pair of fixed wardrobes, a fireplace and a washstand in a recess. The uncompromising plainness of the furniture is relieved by stencilled panels. The deadline of 25 March 1901 for the competition suggests that this design is earlier than that for the main bedroom at Windyhill, where the same features were used, with minor differences in the stencilling.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 1 Ground & First Floor Plans from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.The central feature of the house is the large hall - two storeys high - communicating directly with the dining room, reception and music room, which can be adapted to provide a stage. On the South side a terrace room runs outside the reception and music room. On the North side are the entrance, the hall and dining room, which are separated by a moveable partition. On the upper floor, the principal bedroom suite is partitioned off in the South-East corner; numerous guest rooms are provided and a playroom is in the attic above the childrens' bedrooms. The kitchen and servants' rooms are in the basement.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 2 East & West Elevations from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection. Muthesius in his introduction to the 'Meister der Innen Kunst' portfolio, stresses the impact and novelty of Mackintosh's design. 'The exterior architecture of the building... exhibits an absolutely original character, unlike anything else known... The mass of the building consists of a large plain black, without any breaking up of the walls, the effect being sought for in unbroken uniform surfaces... the windows have the appearance of accidental openings deeply recessed in the walls... Ornament, save in two or three places, is conspicuously absent, all allurements being sternly repressed in order that the desired effect of plainness reticence and therewithal of mystery and height, might be revealed as strongly as possible.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 5 View from South-East from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.Muthesius in his introduction to the 'Meister der Innen Kunst' portfolio, stresses the impact and novelty of Mackintosh's design. 'The exterior architecture of the building... exhibits an absolutely original character, unlike anything else known... The mass of the building consists of a large plain black, without any breaking up of the walls, the effect being sought for in unbroken uniform surfaces... the windows have the appearance of accidental openings deeply recessed in the walls... Ornament, save in two or three places, is conspicuously absent, all allurements being sternly repressed in order that the desired effect of plainness reticence and therewithal of mystery and height, might be revealed as strongly as possible.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 3 North Elevation from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.Muthesius in his introduction to the 'Meister der Innen Kunst' portfolio, stresses the impact and novelty of Mackintosh's design. 'The exterior architecture of the building... exhibits an absolutely original character, unlike anything else known... The mass of the building consists of a large plain black, without any breaking up of the walls, the effect being sought for in unbroken uniform surfaces... the windows have the appearance of accidental openings deeply recessed in the walls... Ornament, save in two or three places, is conspicuously absent, all allurements being sternly repressed in order that the desired effect of plainness reticence and therewithal of mystery and height, might be revealed as strongly as possible.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 4 South Elevation from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.Muthesius in his introduction to the 'Meister der Innen Kunst' portfolio, stresses the impact and novelty of Mackintosh's design. 'The exterior architecture of the building... exhibits an absolutely original character, unlike anything else known... The mass of the building consists of a large plain black, without any breaking up of the walls, the effect being sought for in unbroken uniform surfaces... the windows have the appearance of accidental openings deeply recessed in the walls... Ornament, save in two or three places, is conspicuously absent, all allurements being sternly repressed in order that the desired effect of plainness reticence and therewithal of mystery and height, might be revealed as strongly as possible.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Meister Der Innen-Kunst - Title Page from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Design for the Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow

Design for the staircase and vestibule, West Elevation, The Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. Miss Cranston and her husband Major Cochrane commissioned Mackintosh to redesign the interiors of their home Hous'hill at Nitshill. Mackintosh designed several suites of furniture in 1904 and more pieces in 1909. Stripes are the dominant motif in the decorations, in the panels over the settle and between the doors where they are carried over the ceiling as in the guest bedroom at 78 Derngate. The lampshades are also similar to those used in this bedroom. (Roger Billcliffe). The lattice work recalls the hall at Derngate, but here it is used as an open screen rather than with solid or glazed panels. The only furniture that has been traced is the chair at the writing desk and the small table.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie