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Armchair for Glasgow School of Art

Designed for original board room at Glasgow School of Art. The chairs were designed for the original Board Room in the East wing (now the Mackintosh Room). The Governors never used this room for meetings and it was initially used as a studio while space was short in the half-finished building. When the new Board Room was built in the second phase of the building, Mackintosh designed a more elaborate version of this chair for it, MC/F/61. Six chairs reupholstered in brown horsehair 1985, very similar to the original fabric found on one of the chairs. Two remaining chairs reupholstered in 1986. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Armchair for Willow Tea Rooms

Designed for the Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow. 'A very sturdy but not particularly comfortable chair, used in the ground floor saloons, the Gallery and the Smoking room... Their boxy shape contrasts with the taller and more open ladder-backs arranged alongside them in the layout of furniture which Mackintosh devised.' (Roger Billcliffe). Reupholstered in blue horsehair 1984 (the original upholstery on these and the Willow settle was a green and gold striped horsehair). This item was assessed for conversation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access project (2006-2010), and then again in 2018 following the fire in the Mackintosh Building in June 2018.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Barrel chair for Ingram Street Tea Rooms

Designed for the Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. 'One of the sturdiest and most successful small chairs designed by Mackintosh. The chair was used in the Chinese Room in the late 1940s but there is no record of it being specifically designed for it.' (Roger Billcliffe). The two chairs in the Museum of Modern Art collection (NY) originally belonged to GSA and were donated in 1958 by then director, Douglas Percy Bliss. This item was assessed for conversation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access project (2006-2010), and then again in 2018 following the fire in the Mackintosh Building in June 2018.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Bedside table for Windyhill

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Table designed for Windyhill, Kilmacolm, possibly later than 1901. Identical to a white table (collection: Hunterian Art Gallery) but dark stained. The final account for the furniture supplied to Davidson for Windyhill in 1901 does not mention the two dark stained tables so it is probable that they were made later for the children's bedrooms. (Roger Billcliffe). This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Bookcase for Gladsmuir

Designed for the schoolroom, Gladsmuir, Kilmacolm. The same two metal panels first appear in the design for the fireplace and fender probably intended for Regent Park Square and were repeated in the wardrobe designed for Westdel in 1898. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Card table for Argyle Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Designed for Argyle Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. A very similar table with a square top was also used in the Argyle Street Tea Rooms, and a white version appears in Annan's photograph of Mackintosh's drawing room in Mains Street. Top repaired and repolished 1985. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Chinese Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010). Designed for the Blue or Chinese Room at the Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. The fretted back and side rails match the Chinese style motifs of the Blue Room (as called in the job books). Much of the woodwork in the Chinese Room was painted bright blue or red, but there is no trace of any finish having been applied to these chairs other than the ebonising which most of them still display. These chairs have always been associated with the Chinese Room and so must be identified with the entry for thirty-six in the job books (Roger Billcliffe). All the chairs rwere eupholstered in blue horsehair in 1985. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Designed for the White Dining Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. The basic chair used in the main dining room, and the Cloister Room in 1900. The original seat coverings were probably horsehair. Reupholstered in brown horsehair, 1984. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Ingram Street Tea Rooms

Designed for the White Dining Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms. Glasgow. The basic chair used in the main dining room, and the Cloister Room in 1900. The original seat coverings were probably horsehair. Reupholstered in brown horsehair, 1984. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Designed for the Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. Identical with MC/F/24 except for the shortened rear uprights and splats. Probably originally designed for the Cloister Room, but cut down in 1912 because of the new low ceilings installed at that time. (Roger Billcliffe). Reupholstered in brown horsehair 1984. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).
Designed for the Oak Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. Probably designed to provide the basic seating unit in the Oak Room. An unusual design for Mackintosh in that it is a very strong chair and now used in the Glasgow School of Art library. These were introduced by the School into the library c.1950 as a replacement for the more fragile windsor chairs originally designed for the room. The chamfering along the back-rails of the chair anticipates the similar waggon-chamfering on the library balustrade. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Oak Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).
Designed for the Oak Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. The wavy top rail and twin back rails echo the bent laths fitted to the Oak Room balcony and also used on the dresser. All chairs repaired and re-rushed 1985. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 1)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 2)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 3)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 4)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 5)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 6)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 7)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 8)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Design for a Memorial Fireplace, The Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow

Inscribed: This room was opened by Miss Cranston in the year 1917 during the Great European War between the Allied Nations and the Central Powers.The Dug-Out, which Miss Cranston created in the basement of the Willow Tea Rooms was Mackintosh's last work in Glasgow (designed while he was living in London) and develops his new style seen in 78 Derngate. A dramatic interior was created with black ceilings and dark walls highlighted by strong colours in the decorations. The centrepiece was the Memorial Fireplace, decorated with inlaid glass and paintings of the flags of the opposing nations; above the commemorative plaque was a panel of stencilled decoration in chequers, diamonds and triangles, all in the bright colours used in the Derngate frieze. Two interior elevations indicate Mackintosh's schemes for decoration and furniture, some of which survives.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

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