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Lampshade for Library, Glasgow School of Art: Lower Mezzanine- Composite Medium Canister

Originally, and according to Mackintosh’s preparatory sketches, there were thought to be 53 individual lights in the library, each with punched holes in the inner reflectors which allowed light to pass through blue and purple glass. The central array was made up of 12 small canisters attached to the light frame on the ceiling, with eight medium pendants and five large pendants hanging below. There were an additional twelve medium canisters attached to the coffered ceiling both above and below the library balcony, making 24. Originally there were also four additional medium hanging pendants in each of the south and western window bays, though these four lights, and the medium canister in the librarians office, had all been removed before the fire in 2014, meaning there were 48 in the library. The library was destroyed by the fire, though many metal fragments from the lights were salvaged, allowing twenty eight to be reconstructed from the original metal pieces, eleven to be made from a mix of original and new pieces (composites) and fifteen new lamps created. All the restoration work and shades was undertaken by Rodney French of Lonsdale & Dutch of Edinburgh.

Lonsdale & Dutch

'Battle of Britishness' stop motion animated film

Stop motion animated film

Artist's statement: 'To quote Akala who narrates the film, coming to terms with Britain's imperial past "has come to be a part of any understanding of the contradictions of contemporary UK politics". Empire is greatly linked to our history of immigration. The film draws the link between Brexit, Empire and the question of Britishness through the story of immigrants who have come to Britain from past to present. Every scene is a stop motion painting.'

Rowan, Sophie

'Hostile cups: Deter'

'Deter': 1 of a set of 5 ceramic pots, wheel thrown with hand-built adjustments.

Artist statement: "Hostile architecture is a phenomenon with rase rise significantly throughout urban design this century. A widely recognised example of this type of design is the 'uncomfortable bench'. Interventions of this kind are now familiar, and can even be a cause of comfort to privileged audiences, but it is important to consider their sociological effects. We have replaced human interaction, nuance and empathy with hard, physical and non-negotiable solutions. Identifying five core aspects of hostile urban design - limit, control, obstruct, impede and deter - I have developed a series of ceramic cups which each embody one of these qualities."

Source: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Pe53s2N6laNXHxxQ-RrjA5cjvuFNeUPC/view

Gray, Arvinda

Digital drawing: 'Impression of an altered landscape in the western edge of the green belt in Antwerp, Belgium'

Digital drawing: 'Impression of an altered landscape in the western edge of the green belt in Antwerp, Belgium'.

Photo montage of aerial imagery with digital drawing. Made in May 2019 as part of design thesis for diploma in Architecture.

Artist statement: The thesis investigates the relationship between modernity and us, interpreted through readings and alterations of the landscape inside and surrounding the city of Antwerp, Belgium.

Zaccaria, Marco

'Together Living'

This work is number 15 of 32 produced for the artist's degree show collection during her 4th year of jewellery and silversmithing design at The Glasgow School of Art academic year 2018/2019. The body of work was titled 'Together Living' and was inspired by some of the intricate symbiotic relationships at work in the natural world - many of them unobserved or misunderstood. In the work, diverse materials were applied to mimic these instances of symbiosis. The consideration of tactility and light in each piece is intended to invoke a sense of curiosity that reveals more than initially meets the eye. Piece 15 is inspired by the relationship between ants and aphids - the ants offer protection to the aphids whilst the aphids produce 'honeydew' to feed the ants as a reward. The piece is comprised of handcut out silver (gold plated) and aphid shapes, encased by a protective steel frame as a reference to scientific storage of research specimens.

More information on the wider collection is available at https://eleanorwhitworth.cargo.site/Degree-show-collection.

Whitworth, Eleanor

'Hostile cups: Obstruct'

'Obstruct': 1 of a set of 5 ceramic pots, wheel thrown with hand-built adjustments.

Artist statement: "Hostile architecture is a phenomenon with rase rise significantly throughout urban design this century. A widely recognised example of this type of design is the 'uncomfortable bench'. Interventions of this kind are now familiar, and can even be a cause of comfort to privileged audiences, but it is important to consider their sociological effects. We have replaced human interaction, nuance and empathy with hard, physical and non-negotiable solutions. Identifying five core aspects of hostile urban design - limit, control, obstruct, impede and deter - I have developed a series of ceramic cups which each embody one of these qualities."

Source: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Pe53s2N6laNXHxxQ-RrjA5cjvuFNeUPC/view

Gray, Arvinda

The Glasgow School of Art Home Front Memorial

To mark the centenary of the First World War, GSA’s Archives & Collections and Exhibitions worked with Louise Welsh, Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Glasgow and Edwin Pickstone, GSA Lecturer, to create a memorial to GSA students, staff and governors who undertook work on the home front.

Consisting of three panels with text written by Louise and letterpress prints created by Edwin, the memorial was informed by archival research. The frame was designed and made by Steven Higgins with lettering from Erin Bradley-Scott.

This memorial is a partnership piece to GSA’s WWI Roll of Honour, created in 1925 by Dorothy Doddrell to commemorate students, staff and governors who had served in the armed forces.

The project was generously funded by Mr James McBroom whose father, James Nicol McBroom, was a prize-winning student at the School and who undertook munitions work during the war.

Pickstone, Edwin

'Hostile cups: Control'

'Control': 1 of a set of 5 ceramic pots, wheel thrown with hand-built adjustments.

Artist statement: "Hostile architecture is a phenomenon with rase rise significantly throughout urban design this century. A widely recognised example of this type of design is the 'uncomfortable bench'. Interventions of this kind are now familiar, and can even be a cause of comfort to privileged audiences, but it is important to consider their sociological effects. We have replaced human interaction, nuance and empathy with hard, physical and non-negotiable solutions. Identifying five core aspects of hostile urban design - limit, control, obstruct, impede and deter - I have developed a series of ceramic cups which each embody one of these qualities."

Source: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Pe53s2N6laNXHxxQ-RrjA5cjvuFNeUPC/view

Gray, Arvinda

'Hostile cups: Impede'

'Impede': 1 of a set of 5 ceramic pots, wheel thrown with hand-built adjustments.

Artist statement: "Hostile architecture is a phenomenon with rase rise significantly throughout urban design this century. A widely recognised example of this type of design is the 'uncomfortable bench'. Interventions of this kind are now familiar, and can even be a cause of comfort to privileged audiences, but it is important to consider their sociological effects. We have replaced human interaction, nuance and empathy with hard, physical and non-negotiable solutions. Identifying five core aspects of hostile urban design - limit, control, obstruct, impede and deter - I have developed a series of ceramic cups which each embody one of these qualities."

Source: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Pe53s2N6laNXHxxQ-RrjA5cjvuFNeUPC/view

Gray, Arvinda

'Hostile cups: Limit'

'Limit': 1 of a set of 5 ceramic pots, wheel thrown with hand-built adjustments.

Artist statement: "Hostile architecture is a phenomenon with rase rise significantly throughout urban design this century. A widely recognised example of this type of design is the 'uncomfortable bench'. Interventions of this kind are now familiar, and can even be a cause of comfort to privileged audiences, but it is important to consider their sociological effects. We have replaced human interaction, nuance and empathy with hard, physical and non-negotiable solutions. Identifying five core aspects of hostile urban design - limit, control, obstruct, impede and deter - I have developed a series of ceramic cups which each embody one of these qualities."

Source: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Pe53s2N6laNXHxxQ-RrjA5cjvuFNeUPC/view

Gray, Arvinda

'Space for the Mind': Design thesis journal and Technology journal

Digital copies of Design thesis journal and Technology journal. Artist statement: "This thesis argues that the city is ultimately and process, and not just aging artefact or relic. Conceptually, the architectural exploration is one that embraces the recognition of change through contemplation. By investigating the relationship of spaces to the mind, can a place be designed to evoke this sense of reflection?"

Makwana, Suraj

Lampshade for Library, Glasgow School of Art: Window Bay - New Medium Pendant

Originally, and according to Mackintosh’s preparatory sketches, there were thought to be 53 individual lights in the library, each with punched holes in the inner reflectors which allowed light to pass through blue and purple glass. The central array was made up of 12 small canisters attached to the light frame on the ceiling, with eight medium pendants and five large pendants hanging below. There were an additional twelve medium canisters attached to the coffered ceiling both above and below the library balcony, making 24. Originally there were also four additional medium hanging pendants in each of the south and western window bays, though these four lights, and the medium canister in the librarians office, had all been removed before the fire in 2014, meaning there were 48 in the library. The library was destroyed by the fire, though many metal fragments from the lights were salvaged, allowing twenty eight to be reconstructed from the original metal pieces, eleven to be made from a mix of original and new pieces (composites) and fifteen new lamps created. All the restoration work and shades was undertaken by Rodney French of Lonsdale & Dutch of Edinburgh.

Lonsdale & Dutch

Lampshade for Library, Glasgow School of Art: Upper Mezzanine- Reconstructed Medium Canister

Originally, and according to Mackintosh’s preparatory sketches, there were thought to be 53 individual lights in the library, each with punched holes in the inner reflectors which allowed light to pass through blue and purple glass. The central array was made up of 12 small canisters attached to the light frame on the ceiling, with eight medium pendants and five large pendants hanging below. There were an additional twelve medium canisters attached to the coffered ceiling both above and below the library balcony, making 24. Originally there were also four additional medium hanging pendants in each of the south and western window bays, though these four lights, and the medium canister in the librarians office, had all been removed before the fire in 2014, meaning there were 48 in the library. The library was destroyed by the fire, though many metal fragments from the lights were salvaged, allowing twenty eight to be reconstructed from the original metal pieces, eleven to be made from a mix of original and new pieces (composites) and fifteen new lamps created. All the restoration work and shades was undertaken by Rodney French of Lonsdale & Dutch of Edinburgh.

Lonsdale & Dutch

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