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Architecture With digital objects
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Design for Glasgow School of Art: elevation to Scott Street/elevation to Dalhousie Street

Architectural drawing showing east/west elevations. 'The East elevation is as built... the West elevation has been completely redesigned. In 1897 the roof line falls with the steep slop of Scott Street: in 1907 the lower part of the site provides a base for a soaring tower block containing the Library which, if it has affinities with the spirit of the traditional Scottish tower house, is completely twentieth century in all its detailing... Other changes were made in the course of construction,... the ashlar of the blank wall on the left was replaced by undressed stone and... the normal sized doorway grew to colossal proportions, extending well above the line of the windows (Mackintosh's pencilled alterations are just visible on the drawing).' (McLaren Young).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Design for Windyhill, Kilmacolm, perspective from south-west

Design for William Davidson. In the mid 1890s Mackintosh met William Davidson, a young Glasgow businessman, who commissioned him to design some furniture for his flat in Gladsmuir, his parents' house at Kilmacolm. About 1899 Davidson decided to build his own house, and Windyhill was the first of Mackintosh's private houses. It was completed in 1901 and still survives. Mackintosh designed the furniture for the hall, drawing room, schoolroom and principal bedroom, much of which survives in the GSA collection.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Design for the Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow

Design for the staircase and vestibule, West Elevation, The Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. Miss Cranston and her husband Major Cochrane commissioned Mackintosh to redesign the interiors of their home Hous'hill at Nitshill. Mackintosh designed several suites of furniture in 1904 and more pieces in 1909. Stripes are the dominant motif in the decorations, in the panels over the settle and between the doors where they are carried over the ceiling as in the guest bedroom at 78 Derngate. The lampshades are also similar to those used in this bedroom. (Roger Billcliffe). The lattice work recalls the hall at Derngate, but here it is used as an open screen rather than with solid or glazed panels. The only furniture that has been traced is the chair at the writing desk and the small table.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Design for Windyhill, Kilmacolm, perspective from north-east

Design for William Davidson. In the mid 1890s Mackintosh met William Davidson, a young Glasgow businessman, who commissioned him to design some furniture for his flat in Gladsmuir, his parents' house at Kilmacolm. About 1899 Davidson decided to build his own house, and Windyhill was the first of Mackintosh's private houses. It was completed in 1901 and still survives. Mackintosh designed the furniture for the hall, drawing room, schoolroom and principal bedroom, much of which survives in the GSA collection.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Meister Der Innen-Kunst - Title Page from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

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