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Greece Sculpture
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Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze (Block XL from the North frieze)

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. Figures bearing water jugs. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787. Original currently in the collection of the Acropolis Museum, Athens, Greece.

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Borghese Warrior

Original: Also known as: Discobolus, Fighting Gladiator, Hector, Heros Combattant, Borghese Gladiator. Particularly admired for its truthful rendering of anatomy. A Hellenistic sculpture actually portraying a swordsman, created at Ephesus about 100 BCE. Listed in first catalogue of casts as Greek, in the Louvre and was bought from Brucciani. Original currently in the collection of the Louvre, Paris, France.
Photographed in GSA in 1915.

Plaster cast of Standing Discobolus (Discophoros)

Original: Discovered in 1781 on Esquiline Hill. Considered to be a copy of an earlier Greek original. The popularity of the sculpture in antiquity was no doubt due to its representation of the athletic ideal. Discus-throwing was the first element in the pentathlon, and while pentathletes were in some ways considered inferior to those athletes who excelled at a particular sport, their physical appearance was much admired. This was because no one particular set of muscles was over-developed, with the result that their proportions were harmonious. Listed in the first catalogue of casts as Greek, located in Vatican and bought from Brucciani. Original currently in the collection of the Louvre, Paris, France.
Photographed in GSA 1915.

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of the Belvedere Apollo (also called Pythian Apollo)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: The Apollo is thought to be a Roman copy of Hadrianic date (120 - 140 BC) of a lost bronze original made between 350 and 325 BC by the Greek sculptor Leochares. Statue depicts the Greek god Apollo, who has just overtaken the serpent Python, the cthonic serpent of Delphi. Apollo has been variously recognized as a god of light and the sun; truth and prophecy; archery; medicine, healing and plague; music, poetry, and the arts; and more. Apollo is the son of Zeus and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis. Listed in first catalogue of casts as Greco-Roman and from the Vatican Museum, and purchased from D. Brucciani. Original currently in the collection of the Vatican Museum, Rome, italy.

Plaster cast of Crouching Discobolos

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: The Discobolus of Myron is a famous lost Greek bronze original that was completed towards the end of the Severe period, c460-450 BC. It is known through numerous Roman copies, both full-scale ones in marble, such as the first to be recovered, the Palombara Discobolus, or smaller scaled versions in bronze. Bought from Brucciani. Original currently in the collectio of the British Museum, London, UK.

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze (South Frieze XLIV)

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. A section of the south frieze showing men leading sacrificial animals. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze (West Frieze II)

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. Horsemen. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Plaster cast of Parthenon Frieze

Original: Designed by Pheidias, 447-432BC. It is generally agreed that the frieze depicts (in narrative form) the Greater Panathenaic procession from the Leokoreion by the Dipylon gate to the Acropolis, was mooted by Stuart and Revett in the second volume of their Antiquities of Athens, 1787.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Dione and Aphrodite (From Hestia, Dione and Aphrodite)

  • PC/017
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: Figures from the east pediment of the Parthenon depicting the birth of Athena. The Acropolis, Athens, Greece, about 438-432 BC. The two figures are thought to be Dione cradling her daughter Aphrodite; they are remarkable for their naturalistic rendering of anatomy blended with a harmonious representation of complex draperies. However, another suggestion is that the two figures on the right are the personification of the Sea (Thalassa) in the lap of the Earth (Gaia). Original currently in the collection of the British Museum, London, UK.

Plaster cast of Titan

  • PC/022
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

Original: Greek sculpture from 184 BC. Original currently in the collection of the Staaliche Museum, Berlin, Germany.

Plaster cast of Crouching Venus (Crouching Aphrodite)

  • PC/024
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

Original: Also known as: Venere nel bagno, Venere nella conchiglia. Likely to be a Roman adaptation of Doidalses' Crouching Aphrodite (a lost Greek original from the 3rd century BC). Original currently in the collection of the Louvre, Paris, France.

Plaster cast of the Wrestlers

  • PC/027
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: Also known as: Antique Boxers, Grecian Boxers, La Lotta, Lottatori. Roman Wrestlers Roman marble sculpture after a lost Greek original of the third century BCE, discovered near Porta S. Giovanni, Rome. Head and right arm of uppermost figure are 16th century restorations. The two young men are engaged in the sport called Pankration. Original currently in the collection of the Uffizi, Florence, Italy.

Plaster cast of Aristotle

  • PC/200
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

Original: Roman copy (2nd century bc) of a Greek original (c325 bc); currently in the collection of the Museo Nazionale Romano, Rome.

Not available / given

Plaster cast of Charioteer of Delphi

  • PC/008
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: The life-size bronze statue of a chariot driver was found in 1896 at the Sanctuary of Apollo in Delphi and is also known as Heniokhos, the rein-holder. The statue was erected at Delphi in 474BC, to commemorate the victory of a chariot team in the Pythean Games, which were held at Delphi every four years in honor of Pythean Apollo. Original currently in the collection of the Delphi Archaeological Museum, Greece.

Plaster cast of Venus de Milo (Aphrodite of Milos)

  • PC/023B
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018.

Original: Created at some time between 130 and 100 BC, to revive pre-hellenistic ideas. It is believed to depict Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) the Greek goddess of love and beauty. Original excavated in 1820 on the Island of Melos. Original currently in the collection of the Louvre, Paris, France.

Plaster cast of Venus de Milo (Aphrodite of Milos)

  • PC/023C
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.

Original: Created at some time between 130 and 100 BC, to revive pre-hellenistic ideas. It is believed to depict Aphrodite (Venus to the Romans) the Greek goddess of love and beauty. Original excavated in 1820 on the Island of Melos. Original currently in the collection of the Louvre, Paris, France.

Plaster cast of Shy Venus

  • PC/025
  • Item
  • Mid 19th century-early 20th century
  • Part of Plaster Casts

Original: Hellenistic marble sculpture depicting the Greek goddess of love Aphrodite. One of the most copied sculptures of all time. Arms are 17th century replicas. Thought to be an Athenian copy from the first century B.C. of a bronze original derived from the type of the Cnidian Venus of Praxilities (by one of the ones of immediate followers of Cnidian). Original currently in the collection of the Uffizi, Florence, Italy.

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