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Landscapes (representations) With digital objects
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The Village, Worth Matravers

In July Mackintosh and Margaret Macdonald spent a holiday in Dorset re-visiting many of the place he had visited in 1895. 'In 'The Village' and 'The Downs' Mackintosh makes his first conscious moves towards his mature style of the Port Vendres period. He is obviously concerned with the pattern of the landscape, picking out features like the stepped hillside, the stone walls, paths and roofs of village houses. These ordinary motifs are given an eerie emphasis by being painted in an equally detailed manner whether they are in the foreground of the the distance... it was probably at this time... that he decided to concentrate more and more on painting. By 1923 he had decided to forsake architecture and design and devote the rest of his life to producing watercolours.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Downs, Worth Matravers

'As in 'The Village' there are no figures in this view of the Dorset countryside. This absolute lack of human activity gives Mackintosh's pictures an air of eerie, even surreal, desertion. They are formal landscapes... the most dominant feature in this work is the tall telegraph pole, a formal and unnatural element in this gentle Dorset landscape.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Edge of A Wood, Milngavie

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Landscape study of woods in Milngavie, near Glasgow. Verso: 'Edge of a wood, Milngavie', John Laurie, 4 Somerset Place Mews Glasgow G3.

Laurie, John

Catterline, Aberdeenshire

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Study of Catterline shoreline, looking northwards over the bay and showing the pier, boat shed, and salmon bothie, with 'the Watchie' building above.

Eardley, Joan Kathleen Harding

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