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Paintings (visual works) With digital objects
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The Descent of Night

Appears in The Magazine, April 1894. 'The central figure is based upon that used in the 1893 design for a diploma for the GSA and like that in 'The Harvest Moon', has wings like an angel. Here, however, she appears naked and her outstretched arms and hair merge and are transformed into barren tree-like forms. These descend to the horizon behind which the sun is gradually disappearing under the feet of the winged figure. From the bottom of the picture, and directly beneath the sun, rises a flight of menacing birds. They are presumably nocturnal birds of prey and they seem to be flying directly towards the viewers. This is one of Mackintosh's earliest uses of this strange bird, which was to become more stylised and to appear in many different forms, in several media in his oeuvre.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Autumn

Bound in volume, The Magazine, November 1894. 'Behind a stylised tree stands another of Mackintosh's mysterious female figures, but this is the first one to appear that is not meticulously drawn. Only the head is shown in any detail, and the shape of the body is hidden by a voluminous cloak from which not even its limbs appear. This figure was to be repeated many times, becoming more and more stereotyped until, with the banners designed for the Turin Exhibition in 1902, the head is the only recognisably human part of a figure with a twelve-foot long, pear shaped torso. In 1895-96, Mackintosh was to develop this drawing into a poster for the Scottish Musical Review (Howarth, p1, 9F). The same cloaked figure appears with similar formal emblems at the ends of the branches of the bush.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Evening

Castle in landscape with figures. From "A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Watercolours: from the first rudiments to the finished picture: with examples in Outline, Effect, and Colouring", first published in London by S & J Fuller in 1814, republished in 1840.

Cox, David

Noon

Llanilted Vale, North Wales. From "A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Watercolours: from the first rudiments to the finished picture: with examples in Outline, Effect, and Colouring", first published in London by S & J Fuller in 1814, republished in 1840.

Cox, David

Pollard Willow and Oak

Two studies of trees; pollard willow and oak. From "A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Watercolours: from the first rudiments to the finished picture: with examples in Outline, Effect, and Colouring", first published in London by S & J Fuller in 1814, republished in 1840.

Cox, David

Three churches

Study of three churches; North Wales and Wiltshire. From "A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Watercolours: from the first rudiments to the finished picture: with examples in Outline, Effect, and Colouring", first published in London by S & J Fuller in 1814, republished in 1840.

Cox, David

Windmill

Windmill with labourers in foreground. From "A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Watercolours: from the first rudiments to the finished picture: with examples in Outline, Effect, and Colouring", first published in London by S & J Fuller in 1814, republished in 1840.

Cox, David

Wood Scene

Wood scene near Sevenoaks, Kent. From "A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Watercolours: from the first rudiments to the finished picture: with examples in Outline, Effect, and Colouring", first published in London by S & J Fuller in 1814, republished in 1840.

Cox, David

Mid-day

Midday, view of a cornfield. From "A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Watercolours: from the first rudiments to the finished picture: with examples in Outline, Effect, and Colouring", first published in London by S & J Fuller in 1814, republished in 1840.

Cox, David

View of part of Battle Abbey, Sussex

View of Battle Abbey with sheep grazing in foreground. From "A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Watercolours: from the first rudiments to the finished picture: with examples in Outline, Effect, and Colouring", first published in London by S & J Fuller in 1814, republished in 1840.

Cox, David

Snow-scene

Shepherd and sheep. From "A Treatise on Landscape Painting and Effect in Watercolours: from the first rudiments to the finished picture: with examples in Outline, Effect, and Colouring", first published in London by S & J Fuller in 1814, republished in 1840.

Cox, David

Eve

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Study after Titian's 'The Fall of Man', c1570. The Titian original is held in the Prado collection, Madrid.

McGlashan, Archibald A

Seated nude

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Study of full-length female nude.

Greiffenhagen, Maurice

Standing nude

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Study of seated nude (female) model.

Greiffenhagen, Maurice

Washerwoman

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Study of washerwoman. Verso: Presented to the Glasgow School of Art by Prof. Maurice Greiffenhagen LLD/3rd, April 1930.

Greiffenhagen, Maurice

A Pond

Bound in the November 1894 edition of 'The Magazine'. "It must have been something like this watercolour.... that evoked the 'critics from foreign parts' (as reported by Gleeson White in The Studio, pp88-9) to deduce 'the personality of the Misses MacDonald from their works' and see them as 'middle-ages sisters, flat footed, with projecting teeth and long past matrimony... gaunt, unlovely females'. Gleeson White who visited Glasgow to see the Mackintosh group was pleasantly surprised to meet two laughing comely girls scarce out of their teens." (MacLaren Young).

MacNair, Frances Macdonald

Leaf of Gold

In 1896 McNair held his first one-man show, an exhibition of pastels at the Gutekunst Gallery, London. Twenty-one works, including this, were displayed in distinctive dark-stained wood frames. McNair had clearly drawn inspiration from Whistler’s exhibition installations, even down to the typesetting of the catalogue. The entry for this work explained, ‘The Fairy is guarding the Leaf of Love from the Witch of Evil who has robbed the Tree of Life of all its other leaves.’

MacNair, James Herbert

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