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Glasgow style
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Papers of Jessie Keppie, artist and student of The Glasgow School of Art, Scotland

  • DC 004
  • Collection
  • 1868-1913

Collection includes:

  • Menus and dinner invitation to artistic gatherings with a sketch by James E Christie
  • London Sketch Club ephemera including menus, invitations, cards with sketches by Shepperson, W Lee Hank, Rene Butt and Jock Bere, 1902-1906
  • F. Carruthers Gould ephemera containing invites to private views
  • tudies for Pictures by J Moyr Smith, 1868
  • Information on John Burnet, Architect, 1814-1901
  • Photograph album, c1893

The photograph album contains photographs of "The Immortals", including Jessie Keppie, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Herbert MacNair, Frances Macdonald, Margaret Macdonald and others of their circle.

The Moyr Smith sketches are from Moyr Smith's first published book Studies in Pictures. Smith trained in Glasgow, becoming influenced by Alexander Thomson and Daniel Cottier, moving to London in 1864.

Of great importance in this collection is a sketchbook of drawings by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The sketchbook, dating from the 1890s, consists of 19 drawings of flowers, furniture sketches, and interior sketches of Craigie Hall, Pollokshields, Glasgow.

Keppie, Jessie

Table runner

White linen and embroidery possibly made by Daisy McGlashan. The design and technique show the influence of Jessie Newbery's teaching. The table runner has the number "1911" printed on one edge in ink which could refer to the year it was made. This item was damaged in the fire in GSA's Mackintosh Building on 23rd May 2014. Textile conservation was completed in 2019.

McGlashan, Daisy Agnes

Mackintosh Art, Design and Architecture Collection

  • MC
  • Collection
  • c1891-2018

Items in The Glasgow School of Art's Mackintosh collection include: furniture, watercolours, drawings, architectural drawings, design drawings, sketchbooks, metalwork and photographs.

The majority of Mackintosh's three-dimensional work was created with the help of a small number of patrons within a short period of intense activity between 1896 and 1910. Francis Newbery was headmaster of The Glasgow School of Art at the time and was supportive of Mackintosh's ultimately successful bid to design a new art school building, in 1896 - his most prestigious undertaking. For Miss Kate Cranston he designed a series of Glasgow tearoom interiors and for the businessmen William Davidson and Walter Blackie, he was commissioned to design large private houses, 'Windyhill' in Kilmacolm and 'The Hill House' in Helensburgh. In Europe, the originality of Mackintosh's style was quickly appreciated and in 1900 he was invited to participate at the 8th Vienna Secession.

In 1902 Mackintosh was invited to participate at the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Art in Turin and later at exhibitions in Moscow and Berlin. Despite this success Mackintosh's work met with considerable indifference at home. Few private clients were sufficiently sympathetic to want his 'total design' of house and interior and he was incapable of compromise.

By 1914 Mackintosh had despaired of ever receiving true recognition in Glasgow and together with his wife Margaret Macdonald he moved, temporarily, to Walberswick on the Suffolk Coastline (in England), where he painted many fine flower studies in watercolour. In 1915 the Mackintoshes settled in London and for the next few years Mackintosh attempted to resume practice as an architect and designer. The designs he produced at this time for textiles, for the 'Dug-out' Tea Room in Glasgow and the dramatic interiors for 78 Derngate in Northampton, England show him working in a bold new style of decoration, using primary colours and geometric motifs.

In 1923 the Mackintoshes left London for the South of France, finally living in Port Vendres where Mackintosh gave up all thoughts of architecture and design and devoted himself entirely to painting landscapes. He died in London, of cancer, on 10 December 1928.

The majority of Mackintosh's design work, (including furniture and metalwork), architectural drawings, textile designs and watercolours are in the possession of three public collections - The Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow Museums, and the Hunterian Art Gallery at the University of Glasgow - although significant (individual) pieces can be found in museums across the UK and Europe, North America and Japan. However, some of Mackintosh's most important, symbolist watercolours from the early to mid-1890s are to be found in the collection of The Glasgow School of Art.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Associated Works

This collection includes works by a number of artists, designers and architects associated with Charles Rennie Mackintosh, including his wife Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh, his sister-in-law Frances Macdonald MacNair and his sister-in-law's husband Herbert MacNair. These works include textiles, designs, and four volumes of a Glasgow School of Art student publication called The Magazine, as well as several individual watercolours now separated from the publication. The collection also includes a number of models for proposed architectural schemes by Mackintosh.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Photograph Album containing photographs of "The Immortals"- Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Margaret and Frances Macdonald, Herbert MacNair, Jessie Keppie and others

These images show Charles Rennie Mackintosh and fellow Glasgow School of Art Students, Herbert MacNair, Frances Macdonald, Margaret Macdonald, Agnes Raeburn, Janet Aitken, Katherine Cameron and Jessie Keppie. Jessie Keppie's brother, John Keppie also appears in the photographs. John Keppie was a partner in Honeyman and Keppie, the architectural firm at which Mackintosh and Herbert McNair worked.

Not available / given

Photograph Album containing photographs of "The Immortals"- Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Margaret and Frances Macdonald, Herbert MacNair, Jessie Keppie and others (Part 4 - Version 1)

Back Row: Frances Macdonald
Middle Row L-R: Margaret Macdonald, Katherine Cameron, Janet Aitken, Agnes Raeburn, Jessie Keppie, John Keppie
Front Row L-R: Herbert MacNair, Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Not available / given

Furniture and Interiors

Includes:

  • chairs
  • tables
  • benches
  • ettles
  • periodical and writing desks
  • mokers' cabinets
  • beds
  • mirrors
  • washstands
  • bookcases
  • cabinets
  • linen presses
  • dressers
  • fenders
  • hat, coat and umbrella stands
  • a baptismal font, letter racks
  • light-fittings
  • clocks.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Cushion cover

Square cushion cover with simple wreath, trellis, Glasgow style roses and leaves, in shades of pale green, cream and pink. Includes chain, satin and cretan stiching, French knots and couching.

Not available / given

Runner

Runner embroidered with three highly stylised (Glasgow Style) flower motifs arising from three leaf motifs below.

Not available / given

'Vanity' mirror

Beaten lead mirror with peacock designs.
The mirror was almost certainly part of the furnishings of the Mackintoshes Southpark Avenue flat taken over by William Davidson when he purchased the flat.

MacNair, James Herbert

Italian Sketchbook

This sketchbook consists of 81 pages of sketches made by Charles Rennie Mackintosh during his trip to Italy in 1891 funded by his Greek Thomson travelling scholarship prize money. The subjects he sketched are mainly architectural, with the one he felt to be most impressive being labelled 'A Caution'. Each sketch is labelled with the name of the city or town in which it was sketched. In 1890 Mackintosh won the Alexander 'Greek' Thomson Travelling Scholarship with a design for a public hall, which enabled him to take an extensive tour abroad from February to July 1891. He left Glasgow for London on 21 March 1891, sailing from Tilbury on the Thames on 27 March and arriving in Naples on 5 April. He then visited Palermo in Sicily, Rome, Orvieto, Siena, Florence, Pisa, Pistoia, Bologna, Ravenna, Ferrara, Venice, Padua, and Vicenza, arriving in Verona on 10 June 1891. The Sketchbook contains drawings from the later part of Mackintosh's tour, from 10th June, with sketches, mostly of architectural and sculptural details, beginning with Verona. It covers Verona (11-14 June); Mantua (14 June); Cremona (14-15 June); Brescia (16 June); Bergamo (17 June); Lecco (18 June); Cadenabbia and Lake Como (19-25 June); Como (26-27 June); Milan (28 June-6 July); Pavia (7 July-?); Certosa di Pavia (probably several days around 12 July); Paris and Chateau d'Ecouen (late July?); Antwerp (late July? - briefly visited on his return journey). It also contains several pages of designs for the Glasgow Art Club (1892-3) and the Glasgow Herald Building (1893-5). The drawings themselves are almost all pencil sketches, some of which are now quite faint.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. For the Luncheon Room, Buchanan Street Tearooms, Glasgow.

Walton, George Henry

The Magazine

There are 4 known surviving volumes: The Magazine 1893 The Magazine April 1894 The Magazine November 1894 The Magazine 1896 The Magazine was a publication of original writings and designs by students from the Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland, and their friends. Appearing in 4 volumes between November 1893 and Spring 1896, The Magazine contains text from contributors handwritten by Lucy Raeburn, editor, accompanied by original illustrations. These volumes are the only known copies of The Magazine. In addition to rare, early watercolours and designs by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the volumes contain early designs by Frances MacDonald and Margaret MacDonald, at a stage in their development which has been labelled 'Spook School', and two sets of photographs by James Craig Annan, when he was beginning to establish a reputation at home and abroad. Among other contibutors were Janet Aitken, Katherine Cameron, Agnes Raeburn and Jessie Keppie, all of whom enjoyed lengthy careers in art and design. The Magazine is similar to an album amicorum such as those which originated in the middle of the 16th century among German university students, who collected autographs of their friends and notable persons, sometimes adding coats of arms and illustrations. The Magazine resembled the album amicorum in that contributions were by a close group of students and their friends and is all the more interesting because the illustrations were produced by young people who had a common social background, were trained at the same school, and subjected to the same artistic influences. the contributors were closely linked, some by family, some by romantic attachments and had close social connections. Other contributors include C Kelpie, John M Wilson, Jane Keppie, and Ethel M Goodrich. Source: Jude Burkhauser, Glasgow Girls: women in art and design (Edinburgh : Canongate, 1990) The Magazine has been digitised in its entirety, and is available to search and browse at www.gsathemagazine.net/

Raeburn, Lucy

Design for a pulpit-fall

Design for embroidered pulpit-fall, 'Be Ye Doers of the word not hearers only.' The words of the design are taken from James, chapter 1, verse 22 in the New Testament. Inscribed upper right: Design for a pulpit fall/J.R. Newbery Centre: "Be Ye Doers of the world not hearers only".

Newbery, Jessie Wylie

A Pond

Bound in the November 1894 edition of 'The Magazine'. "It must have been something like this watercolour.... that evoked the 'critics from foreign parts' (as reported by Gleeson White in The Studio, pp88-9) to deduce 'the personality of the Misses MacDonald from their works' and see them as 'middle-ages sisters, flat footed, with projecting teeth and long past matrimony... gaunt, unlovely females'. Gleeson White who visited Glasgow to see the Mackintosh group was pleasantly surprised to meet two laughing comely girls scarce out of their teens." (MacLaren Young).

MacNair, Frances Macdonald

The Descent of Night

Appears in The Magazine, April 1894. 'The central figure is based upon that used in the 1893 design for a diploma for the GSA and like that in 'The Harvest Moon', has wings like an angel. Here, however, she appears naked and her outstretched arms and hair merge and are transformed into barren tree-like forms. These descend to the horizon behind which the sun is gradually disappearing under the feet of the winged figure. From the bottom of the picture, and directly beneath the sun, rises a flight of menacing birds. They are presumably nocturnal birds of prey and they seem to be flying directly towards the viewers. This is one of Mackintosh's earliest uses of this strange bird, which was to become more stylised and to appear in many different forms, in several media in his oeuvre.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Autumn

Bound in volume, The Magazine, November 1894. 'Behind a stylised tree stands another of Mackintosh's mysterious female figures, but this is the first one to appear that is not meticulously drawn. Only the head is shown in any detail, and the shape of the body is hidden by a voluminous cloak from which not even its limbs appear. This figure was to be repeated many times, becoming more and more stereotyped until, with the banners designed for the Turin Exhibition in 1902, the head is the only recognisably human part of a figure with a twelve-foot long, pear shaped torso. In 1895-96, Mackintosh was to develop this drawing into a poster for the Scottish Musical Review (Howarth, p1, 9F). The same cloaked figure appears with similar formal emblems at the ends of the branches of the bush.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Cabbages in an Orchard

From The Magazine, April 1894. The long text by Mackintosh which accompanies this watercolour in The Magazine (reproduced in full in Billcliffe's catalogue) suggests that he had already encountered public hostility to his work, possibly even from fellow students, on the grounds of incomprehensibility.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Examples of Mackintosh Fabric

  • DC 020
  • Collection
  • c1900-1986
  • Trimming of mauve linen, pre-1914
  • Original cover of Charles Rennie Mackintosh Willow Tea Rooms settle
  • 4 samples of horse hair fabric
  • ample of purple fabric used to re-upholster Charles Rennie Mackintosh yellow settle
  • Letter from GSA Curator regarding 2 of the fabric samples, dated January 1986

Open, lugged ginger jar

Ginger jar without a lid. Handpainted green leaves around the mouth and a yellow design around the body. Two small handles on either side. Signed "AMcB" on the bottom. Ginger jars were initially used to store and transport spices and have been used as decorative items. Similar in shape to a Mary Fairgrieve two-handled pot - possibly a large sugar basin - decorated with a typical Glasgow School design that is featured in the Scottish Pottery 25th Historical Review 2013.

Macbeth, Ann

China tea service

Part set of painted china tea service. Green/yellow lustre glaze over painted flower pattern on white china blanks. Lustreware is a type of pottery or porcelain (china) with a metallic glaze that gives the effect of iridescence due to the metallic oxides in the overglaze finish. Because lustre glaze is not underneath the glaze, it is ephemeral and wears away over time. One plate suffered damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. It has since undergone conservation.

Macbeth, Ann

High-back settle

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. All that remains is a badly damaged copper repousse panel. This was assessed by a conservator but no conservation work was deemed possible. Settle with high back and wings. The style of the settle is very similar to work produced by Wylie & Lochhead and it is most likely that it was made by this firm. The fabric was probably designed by Samuel Rowe. The woven fabric covering of the settle was woven by the firm of A H Less of Birkenhead in 1897 and is jacquard woven and warp-printed wool and cotton. Warp printing was a special technique used by this firm. Although Lee's bought designs from a numbers of leading freelance designers it is uncertain who designed this particular piece although it is likely to have been by Samual Rowe.

Not available / given

Armchair

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Painted white wood with inlaid metals and wood.

Birch & Co

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