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Archival description
Glasgow style With digital objects
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Photograph Album containing photographs of "The Immortals"- Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Margaret and Frances Macdonald, Herbert MacNair, Jessie Keppie and others (Part 4 - Version 1)

Back Row: Frances Macdonald
Middle Row L-R: Margaret Macdonald, Katherine Cameron, Janet Aitken, Agnes Raeburn, Jessie Keppie, John Keppie
Front Row L-R: Herbert MacNair, Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Not available / given

Linen Cupboard for Gladsmuir

Designed for the nursery, Gladsmuir, Kilmacolm. Probably made by Guthrie & Wells. The wide vertical panels running either side of the back of the cupboard, here terminating in two decorated lugs, are a motif Mackintosh often used in later work. One of Mackintosh's early pieces which William Davidson acquired for his home in his parents' house Gladsmuir before he built Windyhill. Original photos of the Windyhill interiors show it located in the hall.
This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Bookcase for Gladsmuir

Designed for the schoolroom, Gladsmuir, Kilmacolm. The same two metal panels first appear in the design for the fireplace and fender probably intended for Regent Park Square and were repeated in the wardrobe designed for Westdel in 1898. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Ingram Street Tea Rooms

Designed for the White Dining Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms. Glasgow. The basic chair used in the main dining room, and the Cloister Room in 1900. The original seat coverings were probably horsehair. Reupholstered in brown horsehair, 1984. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Designed for the Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. Identical with MC/F/24 except for the shortened rear uprights and splats. Probably originally designed for the Cloister Room, but cut down in 1912 because of the new low ceilings installed at that time. (Roger Billcliffe). Reupholstered in brown horsehair 1984. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Chinese Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010). Designed for the Blue or Chinese Room at the Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. The fretted back and side rails match the Chinese style motifs of the Blue Room (as called in the job books). Much of the woodwork in the Chinese Room was painted bright blue or red, but there is no trace of any finish having been applied to these chairs other than the ebonising which most of them still display. These chairs have always been associated with the Chinese Room and so must be identified with the entry for thirty-six in the job books (Roger Billcliffe). All the chairs rwere eupholstered in blue horsehair in 1985. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Fragments of lampshade(s) for Library, Glasgow School of Art (Version 2)

The library was destroyed by fire on 23 May 2014, though many metal and glass fragments from the lights were subsequently salvaged. Originally, and according to Mackintosh’s preparatory sketches, there were thought to be 53 individual lights in the library, each with punched holes in the inner reflectors which allowed light to pass through blue and purple glass. The central array was made up of 12 small canisters attached to the light frame on the ceiling, with eight medium pendants and five large pendants hanging below. There were an additional twelve medium canisters attached to the coffered ceiling both above and below the library balcony, making 24. Originally there were also four additional medium hanging pendants in each of the south and western window bays, though these four lights, and the medium canister in the librarians office, had all been removed before the fire in 2014, meaning there were 48 in the library. This small selection of salvaged lights fragments has been retained as evidence of the fire tragedy. These fragments are also surplus to the needs of Rodney French of Lonsdale and Dutch, Edinburgh who has been tasked with reconstructing the entire set of library lights, whilst reusing as much of the surviving fragments as possible.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Fragments of lampshade(s) for Library, Glasgow School of Art (Version 6)

The library was destroyed by fire on 23 May 2014, though many metal and glass fragments from the lights were subsequently salvaged. Originally, and according to Mackintosh’s preparatory sketches, there were thought to be 53 individual lights in the library, each with punched holes in the inner reflectors which allowed light to pass through blue and purple glass. The central array was made up of 12 small canisters attached to the light frame on the ceiling, with eight medium pendants and five large pendants hanging below. There were an additional twelve medium canisters attached to the coffered ceiling both above and below the library balcony, making 24. Originally there were also four additional medium hanging pendants in each of the south and western window bays, though these four lights, and the medium canister in the librarians office, had all been removed before the fire in 2014, meaning there were 48 in the library. This small selection of salvaged lights fragments has been retained as evidence of the fire tragedy. These fragments are also surplus to the needs of Rodney French of Lonsdale and Dutch, Edinburgh who has been tasked with reconstructing the entire set of library lights, whilst reusing as much of the surviving fragments as possible.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 2)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 3)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

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