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Papers of Jane Richards and Fiona Jean Paton, students of The Glasgow School of Art

  • DC 083
  • Collection
  • c1908-1980s

This collection relates to Jane Richards and her granddaughter Fiona Jean Paton who both studied at The Glasgow School of Art.

It includes:

  • An artist’s palette owned by Jane Richards, c1910
  • a small box of watercolour paints owned by Jane Richards, early 20th century
  • a portrait drawn by Jane Richards, c1908-1910
  • a photograph of Jane Richards, c1914-1918
  • a photograph of Jane Richards' husband in uniform, c1914-18
  • two watercolour landscapes by Jane Richards, 1907 and 1911
  • even prints produced by The Dux Engraving Co Ltd, early 20th century
  • two portraits drawn by Robert Eadie, c1909
  • three sketchbooks for product design furniture by Fiona Jean Paton, early 1980s
  • eight photographs and eleven slides relating to product design furniture, early 1980s.

Please note that this material is not yet fully catalogued and therefore some items may not be accessible to researchers.

One item was damaged in the fire in GSA's Mackintosh Building on 23rd May 2014 and was conserved in 2018-19.

Richards, Jane

Poster for an exhibition of work by John O'Connor

This poster advertised two exhibitions happening coherently at The Glasgow School Of Art in early 1977. The main feature was an exhibition of work by John O'Connor which was held in the Mackintosh Museum and featured pieces in a variety of mediums including drawing, painting, wood-engraving, graphics and illustration. O'Connor spent a brief period lecturing at The Glasgow School Of Art in the graphic design department from 1978 to 1979. The second exhibition was entitled 'The National Book League Exhibition Of Book Design and Production' and was held in the Mackintosh Library. A duplicate of this poster can be found under reference number GSAA/EPH/10/193.

Not available / given

A Pond

Bound in the November 1894 edition of 'The Magazine'. "It must have been something like this watercolour.... that evoked the 'critics from foreign parts' (as reported by Gleeson White in The Studio, pp88-9) to deduce 'the personality of the Misses MacDonald from their works' and see them as 'middle-ages sisters, flat footed, with projecting teeth and long past matrimony... gaunt, unlovely females'. Gleeson White who visited Glasgow to see the Mackintosh group was pleasantly surprised to meet two laughing comely girls scarce out of their teens." (MacLaren Young).

MacNair, Frances Macdonald

Leaf of Gold

In 1896 McNair held his first one-man show, an exhibition of pastels at the Gutekunst Gallery, London. Twenty-one works, including this, were displayed in distinctive dark-stained wood frames. McNair had clearly drawn inspiration from Whistler’s exhibition installations, even down to the typesetting of the catalogue. The entry for this work explained, ‘The Fairy is guarding the Leaf of Love from the Witch of Evil who has robbed the Tree of Life of all its other leaves.’

MacNair, James Herbert

Fairies

Mackintosh's style here is the closest he came to that of Margaret and Frances Macdonald, but his figures are always more substantial and the subject matter less whimsical than theirs.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Village, Worth Matravers

In July Mackintosh and Margaret Macdonald spent a holiday in Dorset re-visiting many of the place he had visited in 1895. 'In 'The Village' and 'The Downs' Mackintosh makes his first conscious moves towards his mature style of the Port Vendres period. He is obviously concerned with the pattern of the landscape, picking out features like the stepped hillside, the stone walls, paths and roofs of village houses. These ordinary motifs are given an eerie emphasis by being painted in an equally detailed manner whether they are in the foreground of the the distance... it was probably at this time... that he decided to concentrate more and more on painting. By 1923 he had decided to forsake architecture and design and devote the rest of his life to producing watercolours.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Downs, Worth Matravers

'As in 'The Village' there are no figures in this view of the Dorset countryside. This absolute lack of human activity gives Mackintosh's pictures an air of eerie, even surreal, desertion. They are formal landscapes... the most dominant feature in this work is the tall telegraph pole, a formal and unnatural element in this gentle Dorset landscape.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Descent of Night

Appears in The Magazine, April 1894. 'The central figure is based upon that used in the 1893 design for a diploma for the GSA and like that in 'The Harvest Moon', has wings like an angel. Here, however, she appears naked and her outstretched arms and hair merge and are transformed into barren tree-like forms. These descend to the horizon behind which the sun is gradually disappearing under the feet of the winged figure. From the bottom of the picture, and directly beneath the sun, rises a flight of menacing birds. They are presumably nocturnal birds of prey and they seem to be flying directly towards the viewers. This is one of Mackintosh's earliest uses of this strange bird, which was to become more stylised and to appear in many different forms, in several media in his oeuvre.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Cabbages in an Orchard

From The Magazine, April 1894. The long text by Mackintosh which accompanies this watercolour in The Magazine (reproduced in full in Billcliffe's catalogue) suggests that he had already encountered public hostility to his work, possibly even from fellow students, on the grounds of incomprehensibility.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Wall hanging designed for The Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. The canvas relates to smaller watercolours in the Hunterian collection, formerly thought to be textile designs, and to their painted canvas, 'The Little Hills' by Margaret Macdonald. It is likely that they were intended for 'The Dug-Out', though it is not known whether they were ever installed there. Jessie Newbery recalled in 1933, that 'He (Mackintosh) and his wife spent the winter of 1914 painting two large decorations for Miss Cranston'. This would have been in Suffolk, after they had left Glasgow. Although The Dug-Out was not created till 1917-18 it is not unlikely that Miss Cranston was considering the project some years earlier. The canvas was found in the GSA in a single roll in 1981 and was cleaned and mounted on two stretchers.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Wall hanging designed for The Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. The canvas relates to smaller watercolours in the Hunterian collection, formerly thought to be textile designs, and to their painted canvas, 'The Little Hills' by Margaret Macdonald. It is likely that they were intended for 'The Dug-Out', though it is not known whether they were ever installed there. Jessie Newbery recalled in 1933, that 'He (Mackintosh) and his wife spent the winter of 1914 painting two large decorations for Miss Cranston'. This would have been in Suffolk, after they had left Glasgow. Although The Dug-Out was not created till 1917-18 it is not unlikely that Miss Cranston was considering the project some years earlier. The canvas was found in the GSA in a single roll in 1981 and was cleaned and mounted on two stretchers.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Autumn

Bound in volume, The Magazine, November 1894. 'Behind a stylised tree stands another of Mackintosh's mysterious female figures, but this is the first one to appear that is not meticulously drawn. Only the head is shown in any detail, and the shape of the body is hidden by a voluminous cloak from which not even its limbs appear. This figure was to be repeated many times, becoming more and more stereotyped until, with the banners designed for the Turin Exhibition in 1902, the head is the only recognisably human part of a figure with a twelve-foot long, pear shaped torso. In 1895-96, Mackintosh was to develop this drawing into a poster for the Scottish Musical Review (Howarth, p1, 9F). The same cloaked figure appears with similar formal emblems at the ends of the branches of the bush.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Tree of Personal Effort

From The Magazine, Spring 1896. Inscribed: The Tree of Personal Effort, The Sun of Indifference, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, January 1895.' The exact meaning of the symbolism of this work, and its companion, 'The Tree of Influence' has eluded all commentators on Mackintosh's early water-colours. The obvious source of the symbolism is nature, and Mackintosh here reaches his most extreme distortion of organic forms.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Building Committee of the Board of Governors of The Glasgow School of Art

Portrait group. Inscribed on frame: "Mr. Charles. R. Mackintosh FRIBA The Architect/Col. R.J.Bennett V.D./Mr. David Barclay FRIBA/Sir Francis Powell, LLD, PRSW/Mr. John Munro FRIBA/Mr. Patrick S. Dunn - Convener/Councillor J. Mollison, MINA/ Mr. Hugh Reid DL/ Sir Wm Bilsland, Bart. LLD, DL/Sir John J. Burnet, RSA, FRIBA, LLD/Mr. John Henderson MA/Sir James Fleming - Chairman of Governors/Mr. John M. Groundwater - secretary/ Mr. Francis H. Newbery CAV OFF, INT, SBC, ARCA - Director, pinxit". When Newbery exhibited this group at the Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts in 1913 it did not include the figure of Mackintosh. In 1914 he painted his large portrait of Mackintosh (collection: Scottish National Portrait Gallery) and his Building Committee portrait group was offered to the Board and accepted. When it was unveiled in 1914 it was seen that he had added Mackintosh's figure, a smaller version of his individual portrait, to the left of the group, and redated the whole canvas 1914. Painting cleaned and relined in 1963 by Mr Harry McLean who discovered the late addition of the figure of Mackintosh.

Newbery, Francis Henry

Portrait of James Craig Annan

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Portrait of the Glasgow photographer James Craig Annan, 1884-1945. Inscribed on frame: "James Craig Annan 1884-1945 by Francis H. Newbery, Director GSA, 1885-1917".

Newbery, Francis Henry

A Cord, Walberswick

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. The Ferry on the River Blyth, Walberswick, Suffolk. The subject is the ferry at Walberswick in Suffolk where Newbery and his family spent many holidays.

Newbery, Francis Henry

Design for a pulpit-fall

Design for embroidered pulpit-fall, 'Be Ye Doers of the word not hearers only.' The words of the design are taken from James, chapter 1, verse 22 in the New Testament. Inscribed upper right: Design for a pulpit fall/J.R. Newbery Centre: "Be Ye Doers of the world not hearers only".

Newbery, Jessie Wylie

Portrait of John Keppie

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Portrait of Glasgow architect, John Keppie. Signed lower left: To my friend John Keppie/Maurice Greiffenhagen 1917.

Greiffenhagen, Maurice

Seated nude

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Study of full-length female nude.

Greiffenhagen, Maurice

Standing nude

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Study of seated nude (female) model.

Greiffenhagen, Maurice

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