Collection GSAA - Records of The Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland

GSA Fashion Show film GSA Fashion Show film GSA Fashion Show film GSA Fashion Show film GSA Fashion Show film Letter sent by Simmonds [from Derby School of Art] to Edward Catterns, GSA Secretary Letter sent by Simmonds [from Derby School of Art] to Edward Catterns, GSA Secretary Letter sent by Simmonds [from Ardrossan] to Edward Catterns, GSA Secretary Letter sent by Simmonds [from Ardrossan] to Edward Catterns, GSA Secretary Letter sent by Simmonds [from Derby School of Art] to Edward Catterns, GSA Secretary Letter sent by Simmonds [from Derby School of Art] to Edward Catterns, GSA Secretary Letter received by Simmonds from David Glen Letter received by Simmonds from David Glen Letter sent by GSA to the Department of Science and Art Letter sent by GSA to the Department of Science and Art Letter sent by Col. Donnelly [Science and Art Department Secretary] to GSA Letter sent by Col. Donnelly [Science and Art Department Secretary] to GSA Letters sent by Francis H Newbery, Director of Glasgow School of Art Letters sent by Francis H Newbery, Director of Glasgow School of Art Letters sent by Francis H Newbery, Director of Glasgow School of Art Letters sent by Francis H Newbery, Director of Glasgow School of Art Letter received by John Henderson, Director of Glasgow School of Art Poster for an exhibition of work produced by The Glasgow School of Art's Design School staff Poster for The Glasgow School of Art Christmas Fayre Poster for a film screening at The Glasgow School Of Art showing 'Midnight Cowboy' and ... Poster for The Glasgow School Of Art Fashion Show Poster for a series of talks on 'Materials And Methods Of The Painter' Poster for a performance of 'Tiger At The Gates' Poster for film screenings of 'Arabian Nights' and 'Laura' at The Glasgow Sch... Poster for a film screening of 'Fury' at The Glasgow School Of Art Poster for the sculpture department degree show Poster for a performance of 'Alice In Wonderland' at The Glasgow School Of Art Poster for an exhibition entitled 'Saying it with Clay!' Poster for an exhibition entitled 'Glasgow Girls' Poster for a talk by John Siddeley entitled "Design For Living" Poster for a ceilidh Poster for a symposium entitled 'Glasgow Plus Or Minus?' Poster for a farewell dinner for Kath Whyte Poster for The Glasgow School Of Art fashion show Poster advertising The Glasgow School of Art Poster for Summer School Classes at The Glasgow School Of Art Poster for an exhibition of drawings by Danny Ferguson entitled The Bored of Studies Poster for an exhibition and artist talk by Patrick Heron Poster for a lecture by Louis Hellman Poster for The Glasgow School Of Art degree show Poster for The Glasgow School Of Art Drama Society production of 'Under Milk Wood' Poster for a screening of 'Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia' Poster for The Glasgow School Of Art fine art degree show Poster for The Glasgow School Of Art production of 'The Noble Spaniard' Poster for a fashion show at The Glasgow School Of Art
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Key Information

Reference code

GSAA

Title

Records of The Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland

Date(s)

  • 15th century to early 21st century (Creation)

Level of description

Collection

Extent

435.60 Linear Feet

Content and Structure

Scope and content

Includes:

  • Records of the Academic Council, 1973-2000
  • Audiovisual material, c1950s-2000s
  • Records of the Board of Studies, 1932-1950
  • Records of the Continuing Education Department, c1988-2000
  • Records of the Assistant Director and Company Secretary, c1986-2008
  • Records of the Deputy Director, c1946-1993
  • Records of the School of Design, c1979-2001
  • Records of the Development and External Relations Office, c1997-2004
  • Records of the Director, 1846-
  • Records of GSA Enterprises, c1991-2000

Ephemera collection, 1890-

The School's collection of ephemera includes flyers, programmes and tickets for events at the School, such as plays, fashion shows, charities week events, exhibitions and performances.

  • Records of the Estates Department, c1964-2007
  • Records of the Exhibitions Officer, c1990-1994
  • Records of the School of Fine Art, c1978-1999
  • Records of the Finance Officer, 1870-2000
  • Records of First Year Studies, c1988-2000
  • Records of the Board of Governors, 1847-2007

Key records include:

  • Annual reports, 1847-2000 - The School's annual reports provide information on governors, staff and prizewinning students, and sometimes but not always, a headmaster's or director's report and annual accounts.
  • Building Committee papers, 1883-1949 - Minutes, correspondence, estimates, specifications and financial records relating to the erection of the Mackintosh Building, as well as the School's extension scheme.

  • Records of House for an Art Lover
  • Records of Liberal Studies/Historical and Critical Studies, c1992
  • Records of Information Services, c1900-2004
  • Records of the Mackintosh School of Architecture, c1957-2002

Newspaper cuttings, 1864-

The School's press cuttings include articles relating to staff and students.

Photographs, c1880s-

The School's photograph collection provides an excellent record of events at The Glasgow School of Art, its students and their work.

  • Records of the Personnel Office, c1987-2006
  • Records of the Planning Department, 1962-1964
  • Records of the Registrar, c1881-2000

Key records include:

  • Student records, 1881-1997 - The School's student registers can provide student's names, dates of birth, dates of admission, educational background, addresses, occupations, courses taken and marks and awards gained.

Prospectuses, 1893-1995

  • The School's prospectuses provide information about staff and governors
  • the organisation and administration of the School
  • summaries of the School's curriculum
  • individual courses and tutors
  • fees
  • scholarships and bursaries.

  • Records of the School Council, 1969-1982
  • Records of the Secretary and Treasurer, 1853-1996
  • Records of the Senior Management Group
  • Records of the School of Simulation and Visualisation
  • Records of the Staff Council, 1909-1949
  • Records of the Student Support Service

Appraisal, destruction and scheduling

This material has been appraised in line with Glasgow School of Art Archives and Collections standard procedures.

Accruals

System of arrangement

This material has been arranged into series, which consist of records related by format and/or function.

General Information

Name of creator

(1845-)

Administrative history

The Glasgow School of Art has its origins in the Glasgow Government School of Design, which was established on 6 January 1845. The Glasgow Government School of Design was one of twenty similar institutions established in the United Kingdom's manufacturing centres between 1837 and 1851. Set up as a consequence of the evidence given to the House of Commons Select Committee on Arts and their connection with Manufactures of 1835-1836, the Government Schools hoped to improve the quality of the country's product design through a system of education that provided training in design for industry. Somerset House was the first of such schools to be established, opening in 1837, and others followed throughout the provinces.

In 1853 the Glasgow Government School of Design changed its name to the Glasgow School of Art. Following the receipt of some funding from the Haldane Academy Trust, (a trust set up by James Haldane, a Glasgow engraver, in 1833), The Glasgow School of Art was required to incorporate the name of the trust into its title. Consequently, it became the Glasgow School of Art and Haldane Academy, although by 1891 the "Haldane Academy" was dropped from the title. Glasgow School of Art was incorporated in 1892. In 1901 the Glasgow School of Art was designated a Central Institution for Higher Art Education in Glasgow and the West of Scotland.

Initially the School was located at 12 Ingram Street, Glasgow, but in 1869, it moved to the Corporation Buildings on Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. In 1897 work started on a new building to house the School of Art on Renfrew Street, Glasgow. The building was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, former pupil of The Glasgow School of Art. The first half of the building was completed in 1899 and the second in 1909.

The Government Schools ran courses in elementary drawing, shading from the flat, shading from casts, chiaroscuro painting, colouring, figure drawing from the flat, figure drawing from the round, painting the figure, geometrical drawing, perspective, modelling and design. All these courses were introduced from the start at the Glasgow School apart from that of design. The course in design was the "summit of the system" where students came up with original designs for actual manufactures or decorative purposes and it was not until 1849, when Charles Heath Wilson became headmaster, that classes in design began to be taught. Also in this year Bruce Bell was engaged to teach mechanical and architectural drawing.

After 1853 the above pattern of courses was extended to 26 stages which formed the national curriculum for art schools. This system was known as the South Kensington system. An Art Masters could be awarded by gaining certificates in the available subjects. There was no restriction on entry and students could take as long as they wished to accumulate their passes before being awarded their Art Masters.

In 1901 the Glasgow School of Art was given the power to award its own diplomas. In the same year Art 91D classes for day school teachers commenced which were later known as the Art 55 classes. From 1901 to 1979 the School of Art awarded its own diplomas and thereafter it awarded degrees of the Council for National Academic Awards. In the 1970s the School of Fine Art and the School of Design were established. With the demise of the Council for National Academic Awards, from 1993 Glasgow University awarded the School's degrees in fine art and design. In 1885 the Glasgow School of Art taught architecture and building construction conforming to the South Kensington system. Following on from the designation of the School as a Central Institution and the empowerment of the School to award its own diplomas, the School and the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College worked together to produce a curriculum for a new course leading to a joint diploma.

In 1903 the joint Glasgow School of Architecture was established within the Glasgow School of Art in conjunction with the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College. For the new diploma design classes were to be taught at the School of Art and the construction classes at the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College. The first diplomas in architecture were awarded in 1910.

In 1924 the Glasgow School of Art became a university teaching institution when the University of Glasgow set up a BSc in Architecture which was to be taught at the School of Architecture. In 1964 the Royal College of Science and Technology (formerly the Royal Technical College, formerly the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College) merged with the Scottish College of Commerce to form the new University of Strathclyde. Following the merger the Glasgow School of Architecture came to an end, the last students transferring to Strathclyde degrees and graduating in 1968.

In 1970 the Mackintosh School of Architecture was established. It is housed within the Glasgow School of Art and forms that school's Department of Architecture. Its degrees are accredited by the University of Glasgow and its Head is the University's Professor of Architecture.

The Glasgow Government School of Design was originally managed, as were the other Government Schools, by the Board of Trade and a Committee of Management representing local subscribers. Then, in 1852, the Government Schools of Design were taken over by the Department of Practical Art. This Department was renamed the Department of Science and Art in 1853 and was located in South Kensington, London. The Committee of Management was replaced in 1892 by the Board of Governors. In 1898, control of the School was transferred again, this time to the Scotch Education Department (renamed the Scottish Education Department in 1918).

The School became academically independent in 1901 when it was free to develop its own curriculum and its own diplomas, subject to the approval of the Scottish Education Department. The chief executive of the School was the Headmaster, renamed Director in 1901, and a Secretary and Treasurer was responsible for all aspects of the administration of the School. As the School grew, other administrative posts were added.

Archival history

Custodial history

Retained in the custody of The Glasgow School of Art.

Physical Description and Conditions of Use

Conditions governing access

Glasgow School of Art Archives and Collections are open for research by appointment. For further details, please refer to our Access Policy @ https://gsaarchives.com/policies

Most records which are over 30 years old are available for public consultation. There is restricted access to records which are less than 30 years old, however these can be accessed with the permission of the Head of the relevant department of the School. Student records are closed until they are 75 years old in order to maintain personal confidentiality.

Some material is currently uncatalogued and therefore not accessible for researchers.

Conditions governing reproduction

Application for permission to reproduce should be submitted to The Archives and Collections at The Glasgow School of Art.

Reproduction subject to usual conditions: educational use and condition of material.

For further details, please refer to our Reprographic Service Guide @ https://gsaarchives.com/policies

Language of material

  • English

Script of material

Language and script notes

Physical Description

Finding aids

Related Material

Existence and location of originals

Existence and location of copies

Related materials

Related descriptions

Notes area

Note

Collection Historical Note

The Glasgow School of Art has its origins in the Glasgow Government School of Design, which was established on 6 January 1845. The Glasgow Government School of Design was one of twenty similar institutions established in the United Kingdom's manufacturing centres between 1837 and 1851. Set up as a consequence of the evidence given to the House of Commons Select Committee on Arts and their connection with Manufactures of 1835-1836, the Government Schools hoped to improve the quality of the country's product design through a system of education that provided training in design for industry. Somerset House was the first of such schools to be established, opening in 1837, and others followed throughout the provinces.

In 1853 the Glasgow Government School of Design changed its name to the Glasgow School of Art. Following the receipt of some funding from the Haldane Academy Trust, (a trust set up by James Haldane, a Glasgow engraver, in 1833), The Glasgow School of Art was required to incorporate the name of the trust into its title. Consequently, it became the Glasgow School of Art and Haldane Academy, although by 1891 the "Haldane Academy" was dropped from the title. Glasgow School of Art was incorporated in 1892. In 1901 the Glasgow School of Art was designated a Central Institution for Higher Art Education in Glasgow and the West of Scotland.

Initially the School was located at 12 Ingram Street, Glasgow, but in 1869, it moved to the Corporation Buildings on Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. In 1897 work started on a new building to house the School of Art on Renfrew Street, Glasgow. The building was designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, former pupil of The Glasgow School of Art. The first half of the building was completed in 1899 and the second in 1909.

The Government Schools ran courses in elementary drawing, shading from the flat, shading from casts, chiaroscuro painting, colouring, figure drawing from the flat, figure drawing from the round, painting the figure, geometrical drawing, perspective, modelling and design. All these courses were introduced from the start at the Glasgow School apart from that of design. The course in design was the "summit of the system" where students came up with original designs for actual manufactures or decorative purposes and it was not until 1849, when Charles Heath Wilson became headmaster, that classes in design began to be taught. Also in this year Bruce Bell was engaged to teach mechanical and architectural drawing.

After 1853 the above pattern of courses was extended to 26 stages which formed the national curriculum for art schools. This system was known as the South Kensington system. An Art Masters could be awarded by gaining certificates in the available subjects. There was no restriction on entry and students could take as long as they wished to accumulate their passes before being awarded their Art Masters.

In 1901 the Glasgow School of Art was given the power to award its own diplomas. In the same year Art 91D classes for day school teachers commenced which were later known as the Art 55 classes. From 1901 to 1979 the School of Art awarded its own diplomas and thereafter it awarded degrees of the Council for National Academic Awards. In the 1970s the School of Fine Art and the School of Design were established. With the demise of the Council for National Academic Awards, from 1993 Glasgow University awarded the School's degrees in fine art and design.

In 1885 the Glasgow School of Art taught architecture and building construction conforming to the South Kensington system. Following on from the designation of the School as a Central Institution and the empowerment of the School to award its own diplomas, the School and the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College worked together to produce a curriculum for a new course leading to a joint diploma. In 1903 the joint Glasgow School of Architecture was established within the Glasgow School of Art in conjunction with the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College. For the new diploma design classes were to be taught at the School of Art and the construction classes at the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College. The first diplomas in architecture were awarded in 1910. In 1924 the Glasgow School of Art became a university teaching institution when the University of Glasgow set up a BSc in Architecture which was to be taught at the School of Architecture. In 1964 the Royal College of Science and Technology (formerly the Royal Technical College, formerly the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College) merged with the Scottish College of Commerce to form the new University of Strathclyde. Following the merger the Glasgow School of Architecture came to an end, the last students transferring to Strathclyde degrees and graduating in 1968. In 1970 the Mackintosh School of Architecture was established. It is housed within the Glasgow School of Art and forms that school's Department of Architecture. Its degrees are accredited by the University of Glasgow and its Head is the University's Professor of Architecture.

The Glasgow Government School of Design was originally managed, as were the other Government Schools, by the Board of Trade and a Committee of Management representing local subscribers. Then, in 1852, the Government Schools of Design were taken over by the Department of Practical Art. This Department was renamed the Department of Science and Art in 1853 and was located in South Kensington, London. The Committee of Management was replaced in 1892 by the Board of Governors. In 1898, control of the School was transferred again, this time to the Scotch Education Department (renamed the Scottish Education Department in 1918). The School became academically independent in 1901 when it was free to develop its own curriculum and its own diplomas, subject to the approval of the Scottish Education Department. The chief executive of the School was the Headmaster, renamed Director in 1901, and a Secretary and Treasurer was responsible for all aspects of the administration of the School. As the School grew, other administrative posts were added.

Alternative identifier(s)

Keywords/Tags

Place access points

People and Organisations

Genre access points

Administrative Information

Description identifier

GB 1694 GSAA

Institution identifier

GB 1694

Rules and/or conventions used

ISAD(G): General International Standard Archival Description - Second edition

Status

Level of detail

Processing information

  • Fonds level finding aid created by Emily Woolmore, GASHE Project Archivist, 21 March 2000 and amended by Victoria Peters, GASHE Project Manager, 29 August 2001 and 3 January 2002 as part of the Research Support Libraries Programme funded project Gateway to Archives of Scottish Higher Education
  • Ammended for submission to the JISC Archives Hub by David Powell,Hub Project Archivist, January 2002.
  • 08 June 2005 Catalogue record converted to EAD2002, May 2005.
  • Fonds level description imported from the Archives Hub, 11 September 2006.
  • Catalogue imported into Archon software and edited by Michelle Kaye, Archon Project Officer, October 2014.
  • Description edited by Michelle Kaye, Collections Development Officer, September 2017.
  • Catalogue exported from Archon and imported into AtoM during system migration, 2018-2019.

Language(s)

  • English

Script(s)

Sources

Archivist's note

Finding Aid Authors: The Glasgow School of Art Archives and Collections.

Archivist's note

© Copyright 2014 GSA Archives. All rights reserved.

Accession area