Decorative arts

Taxonomy

Details / Notes

Code

S10

Scope note(s)

Source note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Decorative arts

Equivalent terms

Decorative arts

Associated terms

Decorative arts

166 Archival description results for Decorative arts

166 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Art, Design and Architecture collection

  • NMC
  • Collection
  • 13th century to early 21st century

Artworks, design pieces and architectural designs related to Glasgow School of Art staff and students.

Items include

  • oil paintings
  • ilk screen prints
  • lithograph prints
  • prints
  • photographs
  • sketches
  • sketch books
  • drawings
  • watercolours
  • collage
  • metalwork, sculpture and ceramics.

Almost all works are by former students and staff or figures related to the history of The Glasgow School of Art. The earliest pieces date from the 16th century and later examples have been purchased from recent Degree Shows. The work is in a variety of media and includes drawings, paintings, prints, sketchbooks, furniture and sculpture. Artists represented include many key figures and the most influential and successful students.

There are also several works from former tutors including Neil Dallas Brown, David Donaldson and Fred Selby, alongside contemporary works by students, donated or purchased at degree show. Key works include those by: Maurice Greiffenhagen, Francis Newbery, John Quinton Pringle, Benno Schotz, Ian Fleming and James D Robertson. Suites of note include large collections of Joan Eardley sketches and paintings, Joan Palmer prints, and architectural drawings by Eugene Bourdon.

Not available / given

Associated Works

This collection includes works by a number of artists, designers and architects associated with Charles Rennie Mackintosh, including his wife Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh, his sister-in-law Frances Macdonald MacNair and his sister-in-law's husband Herbert MacNair. These works include textiles, designs, and four volumes of a Glasgow School of Art student publication called The Magazine, as well as several individual watercolours now separated from the publication. The collection also includes a number of models for proposed architectural schemes by Mackintosh.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Ceramic bowl

This item suffered significant damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. It was salvaged and has undergone conservation and consolidation work in 2018. Brown fired ceramic bowl with grooves. Grey glaze on the inside.

Leckie, Alexander

Ceramic pot

Round pot with a biege glaze and areas of grey. Hand-painted red and gold designs. Rounded top with beige glaze is broken and very fragile. A red glazed rectangular piece is attached to one side with hand-painted white designs.

Calderwood, John

Ceramic sarcophagus cast

Hollow sarcophagus cast with relief pattern of animals and figures. Dark yellow glaze over exterior. White, unglazed interior. '14-103' handwritten in black on bottom right corner.

Not available / given

Ceramic tile

This item was damaged in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. It was assessed by a conservator but no conservation work was deemed possible. Figure on horseback, facing left.

Ceramic tile

This item was damaged in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. It was assessed by a conservator but no conservation work was deemed possible. Figure on horseback, facing right.

China tea service

Part set of painted china tea service. Green/yellow lustre glaze over painted flower pattern on white china blanks. Lustreware is a type of pottery or porcelain (china) with a metallic glaze that gives the effect of iridescence due to the metallic oxides in the overglaze finish. Because lustre glaze is not underneath the glaze, it is ephemeral and wears away over time. One plate suffered damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. It has since undergone conservation.

Macbeth, Ann

China tea service

Part set of painted china tea service. Orange lustre-glaze over flower paintings on white china blanks. Lustreware is a type of pottery or porcelain (china) with a metallic glaze that gives the effect of iridescence due to the metallic oxides in the overglaze finish. Because lustre glaze is not underneath the glaze, it is ephemeral and wears away over time.

Macbeth, Ann

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 1)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 2)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 3)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 4)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 5)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 6)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 7)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 8)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Collection of 31 pottery fragments

Group of 31 glazed and gilded pottery fragments from Persia/Egypt/Syria. Includes imagery of ornamental designs, figures, animals, and Arabic/Cufic lettering. May have been collected and given to the school by William Matthew Flinders Petrie in the early 20th century. Likely brought to the Glasgow School of Art to be used as teaching aids.

1) (NMC/1633A) Fragment of a dish or bowl. Cream glaze on the recto with a yellow/gold hand-painted figure on a horse surrounded by patterns. Metallic/mineral shine. Pale green glaze on the outside.

2) (NMC/1633B) Triangular shaped fragment with cream glaze with yellow/gold hand-painted design on recto.

3) (NMC/1633C) Fragment of what might be a cross. Turquoise glaze with red hand-painted designs and gold leaf. Embossed leaf pattern on recto.

4) (NMC/1633D) Fragment of hanging wall plate or dish. Metal hook for wall hanging is still attached. Made of red clay. Cream glaze with earthy brown and dark brown paint on recto. Inscription of what is possibly Arabic word(s) on recto.

5) (NMC/1633E) Circular shaped fragment of hanging wall plate or dish. Made of red clay. Deep green glaze with dark brown hand-painted design. Label on bottom - 'Egypt 13-15th C.

6) (NMC/1633F) Fragment of wall hanging bowl or dish. Yellow/gold glaze on recto with hand-painted light brown swirl pattern.

7) (NMC/1633G) Fragment from what might be a tile. Hand-painted flower and petal shapes in blue, black, yellow, and turquoise paint. '85' and 'SHAH ISF' handwritten on verso. Shah (Persian) is a title given to the emperors/kings and lords of Iran.

8) 4 small glazed and hand-painted fragments.

a) (NMC/1633H) Turquoise glaze on both sides. Blue, black, brown and white hand-painted figure on recto with some gold leaf.

b) (NMC/1633I) Turquoise glaze and hand-painted black band with white Arabic inscription.

c) (NMC/1633J) 1st piece of rim fragment with cream glaze and band of blue, light turquoise, and red/brown paint on recto. Small band of blue paint on verso.

d) (NMC/1633K) 2nd piece of rim fragment with cream glaze and band of blue, light turquoise, and red/brown paint on recto. Band of blue paint on verso.

9) 4 small glazed and hand-painted fragments.

a) (NMC/1633L) Rim fragment with cream, blue, and black paint with hand-painted band on recto. Hand-painted blue and black bands on verso with metallic/mineral shine.

b) (NMC/1633M) Fragment with aqua green glaze over embossed pattern on recto. '24' handwritten on verso.

c) (NMC/1633N) Fragment with blue glaze on recto and cream glaze with brown/gold hand-painted pattern on verso. Handwritten letters on one edge - possibly 'C S RAZ.'

d) (NMC/1633O) Rim fragment with cream glaze and dark blue, red, turquoise, and gold hand-painted pattern on recto. Cream glaze with hand-painted red band and black arabic inscription on verso.

10) 4 glazed and hand-painted fragments.

a) (NMC/1633P) Rim fragment with cream glaze and yellow/gold hand-painted design on recto. Gold hand-painted patterns with figure on verso. Possibly small handwritten letters on an edge.

b) (NMC/1633Q) Fragment with cream glaze and light yellow/gold hand-painted patterens and figures riding horses on recto. Cream glaze with brown hand-painted designs on verso.

c) (NMC/1633R) Small fragment with cream glaze and yellow/gold, blue, and red hand-painted designs with gold leaf on recto.

d) (NMC/1633S) Fragment of dish or plate. Cream glaze with dark blue, turquoise, black, red, hand-painted figures and animal on recto with some gold leaf. Cream glaze with turquoise, blue, and red hand-painted figures on verso with some gold leaf. One large crack down the center.

11) 2 glazed and hand-painted fragments.

a) (NMC/1633T) Rim fragment from dish or plate. Cream glaze with yellow/gold hand-painted pattern with crown on recto. Small area of cream glaze and red/brown section of hand-painted band on verso.

b) (NMC/1633U) Rim fragment from dish or plate. Hand-painted black Arabic writing on recto. 'GOMBAZ KAOUE near Persepolis' handwritten on verso. Persepolis is a city in Iran.

12) 3 glazed and hand-painted fragments.

a) (NMC/1633V) Slightly curved fragment with blue glaze and dark green hand-painted design and bands on recto. Blue glaze with dark green hand-painted Arabic writing and a green band on verso.

b) (NMC/1633W) Small fragment with cream glaze and gold hand-painted face on recto. Blue glaze with faint green hand-painted pattern on verso.

c) (NMC/1633X) Slightly curved fragment with pastel blue glaze on recto and verso.

13) 2 glazed and hand-painted fragments.

a) (NMC/1633Y) Rim fragment with cream glaze and blue, turquoise, red, and dark brown hand-painted patterns on recto. '15 SAVEH' and '15' handwritten on verso. Saveh is a city in Iran.

b) (NMC/1633Z) Rim fragment with green/brown glaze with dark blue hand-painted desgin on recto. Dark blue glaze on verso.

14) 4 small glazed and hand-painted fragments

a) (NMC/1633AA) Rim fragment with cream glaze and blue and black hand-painted band on recto. Cream glaze with hand-painted black band with what might be Arabic writing on verso.

b) (NMC/1633BB) Small fragment with raised blue hand-painted pattern. 'SAVEH 11' handwritten on verso. Saveh is a city in Iran.

c) (NMC/1633CC) Small rim fragment with cream glaze, blue and red hand-painted design, and pale blue band on recto. Small area of a blue band on verso.

d) (NMC/1633DD) Triangluar shaped mosaic/arrow tile. Blue, red, and white hand-painted pattern on recto.

15) (NMC/1633EE)Turquoise glazed fragment from possibly a dish or bowl with a handle. A face is hand-painted in black on the handle. Figures and designs hand-painted in black, brown, beige and red with gold leaf on the inside. Black pattern hand-painted on the outer edge.

Not available / given

Collection of 6 ceramic fragments

Ceramic fragments, possibly Persian. Includes 6 fragments:

1) (NMC/0916A) Polychrome (blue, purple, brown) glazed ceramic tile fragment with hand-painted floral design. Relief of an animal, possibly a goat or ram, on top part. Relief of a plant or tree on bottom part. 'Sulatanabad' handwritten on verso. Sulatanabad is a city, now known as Arak, in Iran. Label on verso - 'Persia 13th C.'

2) (NMC/0916B) Polychrome (blue, purple, green) glazed ceramic tile fragment with hand-painted flowers and leaves. 'Damascus' handwrirtten in red on one edge. Damascus is the capital of Syria. Label on verso - 'Damascus'.

3) (NMC/0916C) Polychrome (blue, green, yellow, white) glazed ceramic tile fragment with hand-painted floral and plant designs. 'Shah Isfahan' handwritten on verso. Label on verso - 'Shah - 17th mosque Isfahan.' The Shah Mosque (Persian), also known as Imam Mosque (Persian), is a mosque in Isfahan, Iran. It is regarded as one of the masterpieces of Irania/Persian architecture and an example of Islamic era architecture of Iran. It employed the haft rangi (seven-colour) style of tile mosaic.

4) (NMC/0916D) Polychrome (blue, brown, gold) glazed ceramic tile fragment with what might be hand-painted or transfer printing design of a seated human figure. Border along the left side on recto could possibly be script. Left edge has a pointed, triangular shape. The fragment appears to have been broken into 3 parts and then was glued back together. Label on verso - 'Persia 13th C.'

5) (NMC/0916E) Glazed, star-shaped ceramic tile with 8 points. Has what might be hand-painted or transfer printing of a brown, standing bird figure. Appears a label was on verso, however most of it has been removed. Some chipping is present, otherwise the ceramic tile is intact.

6) (NMC/0916F) Polychrome (blue, green) glazed fragment from the bottom of a ceramic vase with handpainted spotted animal, possibly a deer, surronded by a floral design. Label on verso - 'Sultanabad 14th C.' Sulatanabad is a city, now known as Arak, in Iran.

Not available / given

Decorative leatherwork display case

Wooden display case of decorative leatherwork by P. Wylie Davidson showing examples of materials and techniques. Back of case has GSA label "Leatherwork. 'B', 19.1.58". Back of case also has list of "educational notes". Due to information in archival documentation, display case can be dated pre-1943.

Davidson, Peter Wylie

Decorative plate

Ceramic blank with handpainted gold decorative band. Enamel is wearing off which could be due to poor firing or could have not been fired at all. Signed "June Wilson 161, 1st year, (Patent applied for)" verso.

Wilson, June

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