Showing 2218 results

Person/Organisation
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Keith, Anne

  • S818
  • Person

Anne Keith studied Printed Textiles at GSA and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show. Anne taught in Printed Textiles at GSA in the late 1960s.

As at July 2017, Anne works in painting and bookmaking and exhibits books. She has won a number of awards including the Flora Wood Award and The Art Quilt Award.

Source: Anne Keith website sites.google.com/site/annekeithtextileartist/

Bates, Sheila

  • S906
  • Person

Glasgow School of Art Student.

Mackie, William Robert, fl c20th century

  • P715
  • Person
  • fl c20th century

William Robert Mackie studied architecture at Glasgow School of Art and remained there for a further qualification in Town Planning. He was elected ARIBA in 1954.

Salmon, James Jr

  • S930
  • Person

James Salmon (Junior) was born on 13 April 1873 at 12 Seton Terrace, Glasgow, the son of architect William Forrest Salmon and Jessie Alexander, and grandson of architect James Salmon (Senior). He was initially educated privately and sent to Glasgow High School in September 1883. After his mother's sudden death in 1887 while staying with her sister and brother-in-law Elizabeth and William Scott Morton in Edinburgh, James and his brother Hugh (born 16 November 1874) were brought up partly by their father's formidable elder sister Wilhelmina - 'Aunt Mina' - who had looked after her father since her mother's death in 1881. Hugh was tall like his father and grandfather, James was relatively short in stature resulting in the sobriquets of 'Wee Troot' or 'Sardine', both of which he used himself. He was witty, forceful and irreverent both as a speaker and as a writer. Although he could often be hilarious his brother Hugh recalled that he never laughed: a sardonic 'Huh huh' was as much as he could manage.

After the death of James Salmon (Senior) on 5 June 1888, William Forrest continued the business under the same name. In the same year James Salmon Junior left Glasgow High School to join the family firm, where he remained for two year, studying at Glasgow School of Art. In 1890 he was sent to William Leiper's office to complete his apprenticeship, continuing to attend the classes at Glasgow School of Art until 1891 and again from 1892 to 1895, an unusually extended period. His aim appears to have been not only to benefit from the teaching of William James Anderson but also to maintain links with the 'New Sculpture' group there, the cosmopolitan Francis Derwent Wood, who had studied in Karlsruhe and Paris, the Dutchman Johan Keller and their Scots student Albert Hodge (who were to have a profound effect on the firm's architecture in the later 1890s and early 1900s).

James left Leiper's office in 1894 at the end of his articles. Leiper's influence on him was to remain marked in both commercial and domestic work. As a twenty-first birthday present Forrest sent him on a Grand Tour of the continent which is partly chronicled in watercolours in the Salmon collection at NMRS made between April and July of that year; the tour included France, Germany, Switzerland, Norway, Belgium, Holland, Austria, Hungary, Romania, Turkey, Greece and Spain. He returned to the family firm in March 1895 to find John Gaff Gillespie (born 1870) in charge of most of the design work. Gillespie had been articled to James Milne Monro c. 1884, concurrently attending classes at Glasgow School of Art, and he won the Glasgow Institute of Architects prize in 1889 jointly with Charles Rennie Mackintosh. This had brought him to the notice of Forrest Salmon who engaged him in 1891. Like Mackintosh at Honeyman & Keppie, Gillespie was given design responsibility very early, notably at the free Flemish Renaissance Scottish Temperance League building in 1893 and the West of Scotland Convalescent Seaside Homes at Dunoon in 1895. Sometime in that same year, Forrest made Gillespie a partner, the everyday work of the practice having grown as a result of Forrest having secured some of the business of the British Linen Bank, whose architects were usually J M Dick Peddie & Washington Browne. Unlike the diminutive James Salmon, Gillespie was very tall, slim and cleanshaven with a calm equable temperament.

On his return James Salmon Junior worked under his father and Gillespie for rather more than two years, being given much of the design responsibility for Mercantile Chambers on Bothwell Street, a huge project in which the Salmons had a financial interest and which was to become their office. James became a partner in 1898, but for the next few years and even beyond the individual design responsibilities of Gillespie and James Junior are not always easy to separate. Their names were not acknowledged in the practice title until November 1903 when the firm became Salmon Son & Gillespie.

By that date there had been domestic changes in the Salmon family. Wilhelmina had remained unmarried and eventually a house at Lochgoilhead, renamed Gowandean, was bought for her and extended in 1897-98, before her father's death. On 11 June 1889 Forrest, remembered in the family as something of a ladies' man, married Agnes Cooper Barry, the daughter of a Forfar grocer who lived with her brother the Reverend James Cooper Barry, a civil engineer who had switched career to become a Free Church minister in 1882 and had obtained the charge of the North Free Church at Dumbarton. Neither Wilhelmina nor Forrest's sons took to Agnes, always referring to her as 'Steppy'. Hugh left home in 1894 to work for his grandfather at Arrat Mill, Brechin, and Auchenblae, Kincardineshire, emigrating to Dunedin in 1898 as wool and seed manager to Wright Stephenson & Company. James remained at home and in 1898 the Salmon family moved to the newly built Rowantreehill at Kilmacolm where they rapidly acquired a significant domestic clientele.

In his later years Forrest became prominent in professional matters as a Governor of Glasgow School of Art, President of the Glasgow Institute of Architects 1892-94, and a member of the RIBA Council. It was probably due to his influence that Gillespie and James Junior were admitted directly to Fellowship of the RIBA on 3 December 1906, James's proposers being Leiper, John James Burnet, Watson and his father. By 1906 both Gillespie and James Junior had travelled extensively. James Junior's nomination paper records travel in Norway, Holland (1904), Romania, Austria and Hungary (1904), France (1894 and 1906), Switzerland (1894), Spain, Italy (1894 and 1904), Greece and Turkey (probably 1904). We also know from a letter from James to Hugh Salmon of 14 April 1903 that James had travelled to Brittany in 1896 with Robert (Bob') Whyte. Sketches and photographs preserved in the Salmon collection at NMRS have left his travels well documented.

By the early 1900s Gillespie and Salmon's styles had begun to diverge, Gillespie's work tending to be a simplified free classic and Salmon's still a sculpturesque art nouveau as seen in the alternative elevational treatments in the competition for the new Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College competition of 1901, both partners adopting a highly simplified arts and crafts style for domestic, cottage hospital and golf clubhouse work. But from 1904 when they received the commission for Lion Chambers both Gillespie and James Junior had become interested in the possibilities of reinforced concrete, working closely with the structural engineer Louis Gustave Mouchel, the British-based representative of Francois Hennebique. Within the firm Forrest seems to have been responsible for the 'scheming out' of commissions, the detailed design work being delegated to Gillespie or to his son James. Forrest was latterly known as the commercial traveller adept at moving in Parish Council School Board and clubland circles to obtain directly commissioned work for the practice which spent much of its time on designs for national and local competitions, none of which it succeeded in actually winning until 1908 when William Leiper selected their design for Stirling Municipal Buildings which was mainly Gillespie's work. Construction was, however, some years away and in the summer of 1911 Forrest began to suffer from cancer. He died at Rowantreehill on 7 October. By his own wish he was buried with his first wife and the Scott Mortons at Merchiston Cemetery, Edinburgh. He left moveable estate of £7,008 11s. 4d..

While the Finance Act of 1909 had probably affected the prosperity of the practice as it had so many others, Forrest Salmon's will proved the catalyst for the dissolution of the partnership in June 1913. The will made no provision for James to inherit his share of the practice; instead, it remained part of his trust estate and entitled 'Steppy' to a share of such profits as the firm had at that time. Gillespie now became senior partner and as James Junior had spent all his income on foreign travel and motoring (as a letter to Hugh of 18 August 1910 records) he could not afford to buy out either Gillespie or his stepmother. Gillespie bought out Agnes's interest, retaining the office in Mercantile Chambers, the archive (which was later sent for pulping when his successor Jack Antonio Coia was interned in 1940) and the Stirling commission. James moved out to a rented flat at 48 Jane Street, Blythswood Square which was both home and office, apparently without even a secretary. He retained the commission received in 1909 for the Admiralty Village at Cove Farm, Greenock of which only a few houses had been built in 1910, and was allowed to revive the name of the firm as it had existed prior to 1903, James Salmon & Son, later abbreviated simply to James Salmon FRIBA.

The few clients James Salmon Junior had for actual building in 1913-14 were all medical, probably introduced through his friend Dr James Devon. He developed Repertory Theatre connections from 1914 but although he made many sketch designs, one including an hotel, none of these was pursued further. When war came his Admiralty connections stood him in surprisingly good stead, with the garden village development at Cove Farm going ahead; he also received commissions for workers' housing at Greenock and Cambuslang, which were not built. The income from these enabled him to marry, in a civil ceremony on 2 (or 14;

Sources vary) February 1917, Dr Agnes Picken, a colleague of Dr Devon's at Duke Street Prison, remembered by Hugh's daughter Anne as 'a very direct, no nonsense, amusing resolute woman who had had to make her own way in the world'. They lived in Salmon's house and office in Jane Street and at the end of the war became deeply involved in welfare work in the Balkans, particularly in respect of Dr Katherine McPhail's Sanatorium for sick children at Brababic, Ragusa working in association with the American Relief Administration European Children's Fund. Lectures given in 1920 and 1921, together with other papers relating to these activities, survive.

Salmon's post-war clients remained exclusively medical, his only sizeable commission being the reconstruction of Redlands on Great Western Road as Glasgow Women's Private Hospital, begun in 1921. Like his father he took a particular interest in professional matters and was editor of the RIAS Quarterly in 1921-22.

James Salmon's last months greatly distressed his wife and friends. By the autumn of 1923 he was unable to continue his practice because of bowel cancer. Moreover he was responsible for his aunt Wilhelmina who had become senile with arterio sclerosis and had to be taken into Craighouse, Edinburgh, the cost of which must have been a considerable financial strain. She died on 9 January 1924 and it fell to him to wind up what was left of his grandfather's Trust for her. Salmon himself died only three-and-a-half months later on 27 April, at his home, 48 Jane Street. The letters Dr Devon wrote to keep him amused and interested in his last weeks are in the NMRS collection. His estate amounted to only £535 9s. 6d., part of which was his inheritance from his Aunt Wilhelmina's Trust; his funeral was private.

Sources: Dictionary of Scottish Architects: http://www.scottisharchitects.org.uk/architect_full.php?id=203315

Adair, Ninian

  • S762
  • Person

Ninian Adair studied at GSA in the late 1970s, and is credited with the set and lighting for the 1978 fashion show. He was awarded a scholarship for postgraduate study in session 1976-77 and the Scottish Education Department Travelling Scholarship in session 1978-79.

He is a Member of the Chartered Society of Designers and at 2013 was working as an interior designer at BDP Inc in London.

Sources:

Anderson, Sheila

  • S764
  • Person

Sheila Anderson studied at GSA in the late 1970s and modelled in the 1978 fashion show. As at July 2017, she is a professional artist based in the south of England.

Source: Sheila Anderson Hardy, Artist http://www.sheilafineart.com/

Armour, Fiona

  • S765
  • Person

Fiona Armour was a Textiles student at GSA from 1975, and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show. As at July 2017, she is an Art and Design Teacher and Costume Designer in Edinburgh.

Source: LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com.

Melly, George

  • S533
  • Person

Melly, (Alan) George Heywood (1926–2007), writer and singer, was born on 17 August 1926 at The Grange, St Michael's Hamlet, Toxteth, Liverpool, the elder son and eldest of three children of Francis Heywood Melly (1900–1961), wool broker, and his wife, Edith Maud (Maudie), née Isaac (1891–1983). At the time of his birth registration his parents lived at 26 Linnet Lane, Liverpool. His father was a businessman who would rather have been a hunter and an angler. He later advised his son: 'Always do what you want to. I never did' (The Times, 17 Dec 2003). Melly's Jewish mother, to whom he owed his early love of theatre and music hall, was aspirational on her son's behalf. 'She wanted me to be Noël Coward, which may be why I imitate him so much' (The Independent, 8 Nov 1997). Sent as a boarder to Stowe School, Melly came home 'spouting Eliot and Auden and raving about Picasso and Matisse'. He also discovered surrealism in a magazine reproduction of René Magritte's Le viol (a female face with breasts for eyes and pudenda for a mouth). 'For me', he later said, 'Surrealism was a revelation, the key to a magic kingdom where misery and regression were banished for ever and poetry reigned supreme' (Daily Telegraph, 8 Nov 1997). It was an aesthetic that would rule his life. But he also found the release of jazz, in the person of Bessie Smith singing 'Gimme a Pigfoot (and a Bottle of Beer)': 'This woman roaring around, singing that line made me think, "Well, this is what I want!"' (Daily Telegraph, 5 June 2004). In 1944 Melly enlisted in the Royal Navy, in and out of whose uniform he pursued a series of homosexual encounters. But it was art that truly caught his subversive instincts. At a surrealist 'séance' in the Barcelona restaurant in Soho he met E. L. T. Mesens, Magritte's friend and editor of the London Bulletin. Melly was engaged at Mesens's London Gallery in Beak Street, and became involved in a love triangle with Mesens and his wife, Sybil. Melly found he preferred women to men: 'It was just a matter of taste … not a moral decision. Suddenly, I just liked girls' legs better than boys' arses' (The Independent, 8 Nov 1997). Back in civilian life Melly turned to performance as a new means of expression. Joining Mick Mulligan's Magnolia Jazz Band, he sang 'revivalist' 1920s jazz classics, using Benzedrine to stay up all night and occasionally sleeping in brothels. Soho was his adoptive, nocturnal home, 'a scruffy, warm, belching, argumentative, groping, spewing-up, cadging, toothbrush-in-pocket, warm-beer-gulping world' (Owning Up, 284–5). Melly met his first wife, Elizabeth Victoria (Vicky) Vaughan, a fashion model, in a Soho club. She was the daughter of Henry Owen Vaughan, radio dealer. They married in Edinburgh on 26 April 1955 and had one daughter, Pandora, but within a year she had left him for a man with whom Melly himself had already had an affair, and the marriage ended in divorce in 1962. In that year he met Diana Margaret Campion Dawson (b. 1937) at the Colony Room, his favoured Soho dive. She was the daughter of Geoffrey Campion Dawson, railway clerk, and the former wife of Michael H. St George Ashe. She had changed her surname to Melly by deed poll by the time they married on 7 May 1963, two days before their son, Tom, was born. By now Melly's jazz career—he had recorded for Decca—was overshadowed by a new pop culture that he would address in his influential survey Revolt into Style (1970). For the first time a writer took pop culture seriously, applying historical perspective and examining its post-war eruption from Colin MacInnes to the Rolling Stones. 'Pop in this country evolved from its primitive beginnings (1956–7), through its classic period (1963–6) towards its noisy and brilliant decadence (1969–?)', Melly wrote. 'It lit up the contemporary landscape as if by a series of magnesium flares … the evolution of a new kind of culture, neither "popular" nor mandarin' (Revolt into Style, 123). Revolt into Style both reflected and was mirrored in Melly's music criticism of the period. Typically his journalism was unconstrained, and ran from lucrative speech balloons for the Daily Mail's 'Flook' cartoon to film and television criticism for The Observer. He lectured most passionately on his beloved surrealists; and turned to scriptwriting with 'swinging London' screenplays like Smashing Time (1967) and Take a Girl Like You (1970), the latter based on Kingsley Amis's novel, directed by Jonathan Miller, and starring Hayley Mills and Oliver Reed. The sixties suited Melly. He was arrested at a 'Ban the bomb' march, and in 1971 testified at the infamous Oz trial, when the magazine was prosecuted for obscenity. The trial judge, Michael Argyle, asked Melly: 'For those of us who don't have the benefit of a classical education, what do you mean by the word "cunnilinctus"?' (New Statesman, 14 Aug 2008). Melly also returned to jazz, singing with John Chiltern's Feetwarmers, and in 1972 recorded an album, Nuts, of Fats Waller and Count Basie classics. The follow-up, Son of Nuts (1973), included his signature tune, 'Good Time George', written by Chiltern. In 1974 Melly resigned from The Observer and joined Chiltern's band full time, adopting his trademark razor-sharp 1930s suits and outrageous fedoras. It was a pop cultural silhouette, ironic and self-referential. Nor did age abate his sense of anarchy. He fell out with Roland Penrose, surrealist and founder of the Institute of Contemporary Arts, when Penrose invited the duke of Edinburgh to open a Picasso exhibition. He subsequently turned down a CBE: 'I didn't see the point of accepting an honour from a Hanoverian sovereign of a former empire' (The Guardian, 18 Feb 2004). Melly had published his first volume of memoirs, Owning Up, in 1965. A rumbustious, picaresque account of his town and provincial jazz tours, the book was both filthy and hilarious. It was followed by a prequel in the shape of Rum, Bum and Concertina (1977), which dealt with his disreputable naval service and offered such memorable scenes as Melly, the put-upon rating, being defended below decks by a tough seaman: '"Anyone who says a word against fucking Picasso", he murmured gently, "gets fucking done over"' (Owning Up, 320). A third volume, Scouse Mouse (1984), retold his Liverpudlian upbringing and underlined, in a wonderfully unsentimental yet nostalgic manner, how far he had travelled. In all three books he was at pains to strike a deliberately outrageous tone, one that enhanced rather than concealed his essentially humane and affectionate personality. Melly also wrote a witty account, with Barry Fantoni, of his milieu in The Media Mob (1980). His sensitive biography of the outsider artist Scottie Wilson, It's All Writ Out for You, appeared in 1986—a theme pursued in Tribe of One: Great Naïve and Primitive Painters of the British Isles, with Michael Wood, in 1991. He edited Edward James's Swans Reflecting Elephants: My Early Years (1982), an evocation of the great surrealist patron; and in 1997 published Don't Tell Sybil: an Intimate Memoir of ELT Mesens. Hooked! (2000) was enlivened with a passage about masturbating over a trout. 'I put that bit in early because not many people are interested in reviewing a fishing book unless something startles them' (Scotland on Sunday, 1 July 2001). In later years Melly remained a man about town despite being arthritic and quite deaf, sporting a hearing aid that gave him the air of a portly Johnny Ray. In 2005 the publication of his wife Diana Melly's frank memoir, Take a Girl Like Me, reminded the public of the bohemian nature of their lives together, and apart. Melly's own Slowing Down (2005) examined his own decrepitude with unerring honesty and lack of reticence. Despite ill health he performed into his old age, and remained steadfastly in the public eye. In a late interview for the Daily Telegraph he declared 'I'm still a surrealist in the way that I'm still an anarchist. I don't mock the naivety of my youth. I only envy it' (Daily Telegraph, 8 Nov 1997). He died on 5 July 2007 at his home, 81 Frithville Gardens, Shepherd's Bush, London. He had refused treatment for lung cancer, and his wife Diana arranged for four of his mistresses to visit him on his deathbed. He was carried to the West London crematorium in a white cardboard coffin, decorated with paintings, drawings, and poems from his family and friends.

Source: Philip Hoare, 'Melly, (Alan) George Heywood (1926–2007)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Jan 2011; online edn, May 2011 [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/98953, accessed 6 Aug 2015] Note Author: Philip Hoare

Bevan, Catherine

  • S768
  • Person

Catherine Bevan designed children's garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Cameron, Clare

  • S773
  • Person

Clare Cameron studied P/Dip Textiles at GSA in 1977. She organised and was involved with the music for the 1978 fashion show, and also designed and modelled garments in it. She was awarded a scholarship for postgraduate study in session 1976-77.

As at 2002, she was a freelance textile designer.

Sources: GSA Annual Report 1976-77 GOV/1/10; GSA Flow Magazine Issue 1 http://www.gsa.ac.uk/media/455286/flow1.pdf

Cowan, Fiona

  • S784
  • Person

Fiona Cowan studied Textiles at GSA from 1974 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Eakin, May

  • S794
  • Person

May Eakin studied at GSA in the late 1970s and modelled in the 1978 fashion show.

Hely, Paul

  • S808
  • Person

Paul Hely studied at GSA in the 1970s and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

He set up Muse Fashion Limited in 2015.

Source: LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com

Main, Rona

  • S825
  • Person

Rona Main studied Textiles at GSA from 1975 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show. She was awarded the Incorporation of Cordiners and Incorporation of Skinners and Glovers Prize for Leatherwork, and a maintenance scholarship for a further four terms at Glasgow, in session 1978-79.

As at July 2017, she is an artist in Glasgow.

Sources: GSA Annual Report 1978-79 GOV/1/10; LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com

Masson, Jonathan

  • S827
  • Person

Jonathan Masson studied Textiles at GSA from 1974 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Avella, Vianney

  • S767
  • Person

Vianney Avella was a Textile Design student at GSA from 1974, and designed and modelled garments for the 1976, 1977, 1978 fashion shows.She was also the compere at the GSA Fashion which took place at the Contemporary Arts Centre in Sauchiehall Street. She was awarded the Newbery medal in 1978 and went on to do a postgraduate in Theatre Design at the Slade School of Fine Art, UCL, London. She worked as a costume designer for the BBC in the 1980s and 90s and later as a theatre costume designer in The Netherlands. As of January 2018, she is an independent creative consultant and lives the Netherlands. Her father was Alfredo Avella, who taught stained glass and murals at the Murals and Stained Glass department, Design and Crafts Course at GSA in the 1960s and 70s.Vianney is joint curator of the Alfredo Avella stained glass and paintings collection.

Sources: Information provided by Vianney Avella herself; GSA Annual Report 1977-78 GOV/1/10; LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com; International Movie Database http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0042880/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

Brownlee, Linda

  • S770
  • Person

Linda Brownlee studied Textiles at GSA from 1976. She designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Cameron, Anne

  • S772
  • Person

Anne Cameron studied Textiles at GSA from 1976 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Carroll, Jane

  • S780
  • Person

Jane Carroll studied Textiles at GSA from 1976, and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

As at July 2017, she is a director of Design is Central graphics design company, and Spot Specific, which develops mobile apps.

Source: LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com

Cullan, Robert

  • S786
  • Person

Robert Cullan was an usher at the 1978 fashion show.

Ferguson, Anne

  • S797
  • Person

Anne Ferguson studied Printed Textiles at GSA including the P/Dip in 1977, and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show. She is also mentioned for special thanks in the programme for the show. She was awarded a scholarship for postgraduate study in session 1976-77.

Anne subsequently taught at GSA for over 20 years until 2003, setting up the knit course. As at July 2017 she works with stained glass and textiles, exhibiting and running workshops, some with fellow graduate Morag Tweedie. She also deals in glass with fellow graduate Carol Paterson, in their company ACD Glass.

Sources: GSA Annual Report 1976-77 GOV/1/10; Cromarty Arts Trust https://tinyurl.com/ya5tffj2; Craft Scotland https://tinyurl.com/ychoz5a9; Creative Escapes https://tinyurl.com/ybobklqe; The Glass Fair http://www.cambridgeglassfair.com/interviewarchive/int-carol-paterson.htm

Harley, Alison

  • S805
  • Person

Alison Harley studied Textiles from 1974 at GSA. She designed garments for the 1978 fashion show, and was also involved with the music for the show.

She became Head of Design School at GSA from 2000 to 2005 and went on to become Professor of Textiles and Design & Creative Director for the School of Textiles and Design at Heriot-Watt University from 2013.

Sources: LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com; GSA Flow Magazine Issue 1 http://www.gsa.ac.uk/media/455286/flow1.pdf

Head, Martin

  • S807
  • Person

Martin Head modelled in the 1978 fashion show.

Hood, Christine

  • S811
  • Person

Christine Hood studied Textiles at GSA from 1977 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Cant, Christine

  • S778
  • Person

Christine Cant studied at GSA in the 1970s and is credited with the make up for the 1978 fashion show.

Christine has worked in hair and make-up for film and television for over 35 years and in 2016 received the BAFTA for Outstanding Contribution to Craft.

Sources: BAFTA https://tinyurl.com/y7cmycer; The Call Sheet https://tinyurl.com/y8vpbby8

Dalrymple, Fiona

  • S788
  • Person

Fiona Dalrymple studied Textiles at GSA from 1974 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Davidson, Lorraine

  • S789
  • Person

Lorraine Davidson modelled in the 1978 fashion show. It is believed she went on to become Miss Scotland in 1979.

Greig, Sheila

  • S803
  • Person

Sheila Greig studied P/Dip Textiles at GSA in 1977. She organised the 1978 fashion show and also designed garments for the show.

Hitchon, Morag

  • S810
  • Person

Morag Hitchon studied Textiles at GSA from 1974 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Jansen, June

  • S814
  • Person

June Jansen studied Textiles at GSA from 1975 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show. As at July 2017, she is an independent arts and crafts professional.

Source: LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com

Law, Frances

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  • Person

Frances Law studied at GSA and graduated in 1980. She modelled in the 1978 fashion show.

She had been a practising artist since graduation and exhibits across the world. She has also taught at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, and Perth College Department of Contemporary Arts Practice.

Source: Frances Law website http://www.franceslaw.co.uk/cv.php

Mackie, Jeff

  • S823
  • Person

Jeff Mackie studied at GSA in the mid 1970s and is credited with the music on the 1978 fashion show programme.

McGowan, Anne

  • S831
  • Person

Anne McGowan studied Textiles at GSA from 1975 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Campbell, Roslyn

  • S777
  • Person

Roslyn Campbell studied Textiles at GSA from 1976. She designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Clason, Jenny

  • S783
  • Person

Jenny Clason was a student at GSA in the late 1970s and modelled in the 1978 fashion show.

Donald, Ishbel

  • S790
  • Person

Ishbel Donald (now Muir) studied Textiles at Glasgow School of Art from 1975. She designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Ishbel became an art teacher and as at January 2013 was running her own textiles company, Rhubarb and Ginger, with her daughter in Cambuslang.

Source: Evening Times https://tinyurl.com/y85q28we

Donald, Marion

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  • Person

Marion Donald studied at GSA in the 1970s and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Eadie, Margot

  • S793
  • Person

Margot Eadie studied P/Dip Embroidery and Weaving at GSA in 1977, and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show. She is also mentioned for special thanks in the programme for the show. She was awarded a scholarship for postgraduate study in session 1976-77, and a Haldane Travelling Scholarship in December 1978.

Source: GSA Annual Report 1976-77 and 1978-79 GOV/1/10

Fordy, Jack

  • S799
  • Person

Jack Fordy worked at GSA in the 1970s and 80s. He is credited on the 1978 fashion show programme for printing. He printed a number of books whilst working at The Glasgow School of Art Foulis Press.

Sources: The Glasgow School of Art Fashion Show, 1947-2017 https://tinyurl.com/yannmluu; Abe Books https://tinyurl.com/ydxeu32y

Gerber, Sue

  • S802
  • Person

Sue Gerber studied Printed Textiles at GSA and graduated in 1978. She designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Sue worked as a costume maker with Scottish Opera and the Citizen's Theatre, has designed and made children's clothing, and illustrated a number of children's books from 1987 to 2003.

Source: Sue Gerber website suegerber.co.uk/

Hamill, Elaine

  • S804
  • Person

Elaine Hamill studied at GSA in the late 1970s and modelled in the 1978 fashion show.

Hempstead, Morag

  • S809
  • Person

Morag Hempstead studied Textiles at GSA from 1975 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Kane, Sandra

  • S816
  • Person

Sandra Kane studied at GSA in the late 1970s and modelled in the 1978 fashion show.

Keenan, Helen

  • S817
  • Person

Helen Keenan studied Embroidery and Weaving at GSA from 1974 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Kirk, Amanda

  • S819
  • Person

Amanda Kirk studied Embroidery and Weaving from 1976 at GSA, and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show. She was awarded a maintenance scholarship for a further four terms at Glasgow in session 1979-80.

Source: GSA Annual Report 1979-80 GOV/1/10

Klapwijk, Adriane

  • S820
  • Person

Adriane Klapwijk studied Embroidery and Weaving at GSA from 1977 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show. She won the Scottish Education Department Travelling Scholarship in session 1981-82.

Source: GSA Annual Report 1981-82 GOV/1/11

McCulloch, Mary

  • S829
  • Person

Mary McCulloch studied at GSA in the 1970s and modelled in the 1978 fashion show.

McEwan, Frank

  • S830
  • Person

Frank McEwan studied Textiles at GSA from 1975. He designed garments for the 1978 fashion show and also compered the event. He was awarded a maintenance scholarship for entry to St Martin's College of Art, in session 1978-79.

Source: GSA Annual Report 1978-79 GOV/1/10

McKenzie, Margaret

  • S832
  • Person

Margaret McKenzie studied Textiles at GSA from 1976 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show. She was awarded the John Donald Kelly Memorial Prize for the best all round first year student, in session 1976-77, and a maintenance scholarship for a further four terms at Glasgow in session 1979-80.

Sources: GSA Annual Report 1976-77 and 1979-80 GOV/1/10

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