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Person/Organisation

Campbell, Agnes A

  • P833
  • Person
  • fl 1897-1900

Agnes Campbell first enrolled at the Glasgow School of Art in 1897; the Register notes her profession as a teacher and her address as 74 Hyndland Street. The same address was given the following year, though for the 1899-1900 session, she lived at 35 Thornwood Drive.

Campbell, Annie Osborne

  • S734
  • Person

Artist Annie Osborne Campbell was born 27 May 1889, is recorded as having attended The Glasgow School of Art (GSA) from 1910 to 1918. An oil painting which she executed under the tutelage of Allan D. Mainds during the 1913-1914 session was sold at auction by Whytes in Dublin on 24 February, 2014. Notes from the http://www.the-saleroom.com/ entry states: "This painting was formerly in the collection of Lissadell House and the sitter is thought to be a nanny employed by the Gore-Booth family. A pencil sketch by Constance Markievicz, sold through Whyte's [26th November 2007, ex lot 94] bears a striking resemblance to the sitter. In her first year Campbell studied afternoon classes of 'Preparatory Antique; Ornament and Preparatory Painting' under Alexander Musgrove with a registered address at 970 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow. Between 1912 and 1914, her address changed to 89 Marlborough Avenue, Broomhill and her focus was 'Drawing and Painting' as a day student. From 1914 to 1918 GSA records note a further change of address, to the Smithston Poorhouse and Asylum, Greenock. She continues as a day student and is awarded a number of bursaries; 1914/1915, Bursary £2, 1915/1916 the Haldane Travelling Scholarship, £50 and 1917/1918 a "Special Bursary". From 1916/1917 she adds 'Life; Lettering and Studio' to her subjects. The final entry in her GSA records date to 1917/1918. These are scored through and marked "not coming". Canmore records that, "This poorhouse which also contained asylum accommodation for the mentally ill, was built to replace an earlier poorhouse in Greenock which had been condemned in the early 1870s. Originally built with 3 wings, the one to the West was demolished in the mid 20th century. The remaining wing to the East was originally the asylum with the wing to the North housing offices. The asylum housed 150 patients, and there were 450 paupers in the poorhouse. Each of the units had separate dining halls in the centre of the complex. All were under the supervision of a governor and resident doctor. To the West was the infirmary and it provided accommodation for 100 patients. Larger poorhouses, such as this one, often had adjoining infirmaries to house the sick. Further to the West, and detached from the infirmary, was a contagious ward which was demolished in the mid 20th century. A number of service buildings for the poorhouse are incorporated into the original plan and are situated in the courtyard and to the South. The cost of the building was £80,000 and this expense was criticised by some contemporaries who referred to it as "The Palace of the Kip Valley". During World War One, a section of the building was used for military casualties. After 1930 it became a Poor Law Hospital. In 1939 the Admiralty took over the premises and in 1941, it became the UK headquarters of the Canadian Navy and known as HMCS Niobe. With the advent of the National Health Service in 1948 the building became known as Ravenscraig Hospital and latterly provided care for the elderly and mentally ill".

Sources:

Campbell, Catriona

  • S738
  • Person

Born on the 5th of November 1898, it seems likely that this is Catriona McK Campbell, daughter of John Campbell, a solicitor in Oban, and Jane Campbell (nee Forbes) of Hillhead, Glasgow. The 1901 census lists the family as living at 'Tighaneus' in Oban, with another daughter, Agnes, two years older than Catriona. Completing the household was a twenty year old servant, Annie Nicolson, who came from Barra. Catriona first enrolled as a day student studying Drawing and Painting in 1916. In that year, 585 students enrolled at the Art School, twenty eight of whom came from Argyll. Her term time address was listed as 777 New City Road, where she stayed for the following three sessions, leaving the School in 1920. She was obviously a successful student, winning the Messrs Roberson and Sons first prize for painting in 1917. In the same year, the register records receipt of a Carnegie bursary and a 'Highland Soc' award, presumably the annual day school bursary awarded by the Glasgow Highland Society, and a figure of £40 is clearly legible in this column. Her 1917 enrolment also records that at New City Road, she was staying 'care of' Mrs D Stewart, and that her home address was Argyll Mansions in Oban. It appears the family had moved to this address from Tighaneus. Argyll Mansions, described as one of Scotland's finest tenements, was built between 1905 and 1907 and designed by William Leiper. Probably best known today for his designs for the Templeton Carpet Factory on Glasgow Green, Leiper's domestic designs were popular with the affluent professional families and he deigned many grand villas in and around Helensburgh and Kilmacolm. In 1921 a student called Ian Campbell, also with a home address of Argyll Mansions, Oban, enrolled to study architecture (student no. 835) He too stayed 'care of' a Mrs D Stewart, though living at 461 Maryhill Road. Born on the 22nd of October 1902, he was born after the date of the 1901 census, but it seems very likely that this was Catriona's younger brother.

Campbell, Charles Howard

  • S736
  • Person

A student at The Glasgow School of Art for many years, Charles first appears on the Register for the 1910/11 session living at 24 McAslin Street and working as a boxcutter. The following year he enrols again (now living at 49 Edmund Street, Dennistoun), this time his occupation is given as ticket writer and he continues to re-enroll annually until 1922. He switches from evening classes in life drawing and drawing and painting to Saturday afternoon classes in 1917. By 1914, he is recorded as working as a warehouseman and by 1920 he is a storeman. It is interesting that his address stayed constant throughout his time at the School as his early years and family background suggest a more peripatetic existence. Though born in Ayr, by the time of the 1891 census he was staying with his uncle, William M Alston, at 50 Cecil Street in Govan. Also in the household were three of William Alston's siblings, a niece, Mary A Campbell (then aged 9), Charles Howard Campbell and three female servants. The census records that the Alstons were all born in Australia and Charles sister, Mary was born in China. By 1901, the date of the next census, Charles is living at 68 West King Street in Helensburgh. Mary Alston Campbell, Charles' sister is recorded as Head of household and another sister Margaret, two years younger than Charles, also now appears on the list. In this census, Mary's place of birth is no longer China, but is given as Formosa, Japan (the territory had changed hands by this date) and Margaret, the youngest of the three Campbell children was born in "Perroy Chira" but noted as a British subject, suggesting that this is a misprint, and that 'Chira' should be China. An aunt, Margaret Scott Alston, then aged 58, was also in the household, recorded as 'living on own means' and one female servant. It's an intriguing history and suggests that the Campbell parents were overseas - as diplomats or missionaries perhaps - and sent the children to Scotland to be cared for by relatives.

Campbell, Corrie

  • S743
  • Person

Mrs Corrie Campbell was born on the 28th December 1879. She enrolled as a student on the Drawing and Painting course for three years from 1918, each year giving her home address as 220 West Regent Street, Glasgow. She studied as an evening student during her first year, then switched to the afternoon sessions. The entry for the 1919 - 1920 session suggests that she chose to study three afternoons a week, and was taught by Miss Allan who specialised in watercolour. There were very few married women on the School register at this time. Older than the majority of students, it seems likely she was persuing a personal interest in art rather than looking to train for a career, though she did exhibit a picture of Kirkwall Cathedral at the Royal Glasgow institute of Fine Arts in 1921. There is no mention of an occupation in any of her entries.

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Campbell, Daniel Livingstone

  • S191
  • Person

Daniel Livingstone Campbell was born in the Gorbals in Glasgow on the 16th of September 1894. He was one of six children of Marion Campbell, a French polisher, widow of John Campbell, an upholsterer. Daniel attended The Glasgow School of Art from 1912 to 1914 and from 1918 to 1919 as a part-time student in Drawing and Painting. He joined the Territorial Army in 1911. In his Attestation certificate, signed the 3rd of April 1911, he was described as an apprentice engraver, with 5 and a half years of his apprenticeship completed at D Cunninghame, 48 Buchanan Street, Glasgow. During the First World War, Daniel served in the 9th battalion in The Highland Light Infantry. He spent 302 days in France, suffering a gunshot wound to his left hand in 1915. He was discharged in 1916 at the end of his contract. After the war, he worked as an engineer. Daniel Campbell is commemorated on the Glasgow School of Art's First World War Roll of Honour.

If you have any more information, please get in touch.

Sources: Scotland's People: http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk; Ancestry: http://www.ancestry.co.uk.

Campbell, Duncan

  • S1081
  • Person

Campbell, Duncan, born 1887. Enrolled for one year only as an evening student of Drawing and Painting in 1918 (reg. no. 577) His occupation was recorded as engineer and his home address, 271 Kilbowie Road, Clydebank. This address was shared by another student, Margaret Mary Campbell who also studied Drawing and Painting as an evening student. It seems likely they were siblings and it may be that Duncan took the course to chaperone his younger sister.

Campbell, Edith M

  • S735
  • Person

The Glasgow School of Art Alphabetical and General Student Registers for the year 1914/15 list two students under the name of Campbell thought to be from the same family. Lucy Campbell was born on the 28th of May 1894 with a registration number of 457 and Edith was born on the 1[sup]st[/sup] of September 1895 with a registration number 398. Both students are listed at the same address – 3 Hamilton Drive, Glasgow. Edith enrolled as a day student in drawing and painting and Lucy registered for an afternoon class, but her field of study was not recorded. A second address for Lucy is also included in the register at Tighnuilt, Lochgoilhead, Argylshire. The following school year, 1915/16, Edith M Campbell, born 1[sup]st[/sup] of October 1895 with a registration number of 410 enrolled as a day student on the Drawing and Painting course. She gives the same Argyll address as her home address and records 3 Kirklee Road as her term time residence. Despite the slightly different birth dates, it seems likely that the two Ediths are one and the same and that Lucy and Edith were sisters. The 1901 census includes the family of William K Campbell, a mechanical engineer, and his wife Catherine J Campbell living in Oakshaw Head House in Paisley. The Campbells had two daughters, Lucy born in 1894 and Edith born in 1895. Mr Campbell's young brother in law also stayed with the family. It was obviously a prosperous home and in addition to the family, the census records a live in cook and domestic servant.

Campbell, Elaine

  • S776
  • Person

Elaine Campbell studied Printed Textiles at GSA, graduating in 1988. She modelled in the 1986 fashion show.

As at July 2017, Elaine is a Lead Designer at The Walt Disney Company, including product development.

Source: LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com

Campbell, Euphemia

  • S740
  • Person

Euphemia Lily Campbell was born on the 8th October 1893. She first enrolled at the School of Art as an evening student studying design - fashion plate drawing – in 1916. Her home address was recorded as 143 Firpark Street in Dennistoun and her occupation given as dressmaker. She may be the daughter of Robert (born c1844) and Margaret Campbell of 9 Drumother Mansions, Shettleton. Robert was a tinsmith, and at the time of the 1901 census, the father of five children. His son was also a tinsmith in 1901 and his two oldest daughters were employed as confectionary workers. Euphemia enrolled on the same course again in 1917-18, when she was described as an art student. The following year, 1918-19, was her last at the School and she studied Drawing and Painting. By this date she was working as an embroidery designer. For her first year at the School, her course was led by Norah Neilson Gray. The following year Fashion Plate Drawing was taught by Dorothy Carleton Smith, who went on to be selected as the first female principal of the School, but sadly died before she could take up the appointment. The Fashion Plate Drawing Diploma course at this time included the study of the human figure in nature and in art, the study of drapery and material, the making of drawings for the illustration of catalogues, advertisements etc and the designing of dresses as models for dressmakers and tailors.

Campbell, J

  • S192
  • Person

J Campbell was a student at the Glasgow School of Art c1914. He is listed in the School's World War One Roll of Honour.

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Campbell, J R

  • P708
  • Person
  • fl 1996 -

J.R. Campbell completed a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Design in 1994 and a Master of Fine Arts in Textile Arts and Costume Design from the University of California in 1996. He then taught, textiles, computer-aided fashion design and colour theory in San Francisco before being appointed assistant professor in the Department of Textiles and Clothing at Iowa State University in 1998. He was tenured and promoted to Associate Professor there in 2004. In July 2005, he moved to Scotland to become Research Fellow at the Centre for Advanced Textiles at the Glasgow School of Art, where he directed research for the Centre, located in the School of Design. While in Glasgow, Campbell completed a Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert.) course in Supervising Postgraduate Research Degrees for Professionals in Art, Design and Communication from the Centre for Learning and Teaching in Art and Design at University of the Arts London, which was granted in November 2006. He has been a visiting scholar and conducted workshops at the Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology in China and the Auckland University of Technology's Textile Design Laboratory in New Zealand.Campbell started his position as Professor and Director of The Fashion School at Kent State University Ohio in July 2009.

Campbell, Jessie McGregor

  • S1082
  • Person

Campbell, Jessie McGregor, born 24/11/1899 studied as a 'Junior Student' in the 1915-1916 session, taking Drawing and Painting on Saturday mornings. Her home address was 90 Westmoreland Street.

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Campbell, Lucy

  • S737
  • Person

The Glasgow School of Art Alphabetical and General Student Registers for the year 1914/15 list two students under the name of Campbell thought to be from the same family. Lucy Campbell was born on the 28th of May 1894 with a registration number of 457 and Edith was born on the 1st of September 1895 with a registration number 398. Both students are listed at the same address – 3 Hamilton Drive, Glasgow. Edith enrolled as a day student in drawing and painting and Lucy registered for an afternoon class, but her field of study was not recorded. A second address for Lucy is also included in the register at Tighnuilt, Lochgoilhead, Argylshire. The following school year, 1915/16, Edith M Campbell, born 1st of October 1895 with a registration number of 410 enrolled as a day student on the Drawing and Painting course. She gives the same Argyll address as her home address and records 3 Kirklee Road as her term time residence. Despite the slightly different birth dates, it seems likely that the two Ediths are one and the same and that Lucy and Edith were sisters. The 1901 census includes the family of William K Campbell, a mechanical engineer, and his wife Catherine J Campbell living in Oakshaw Head House in Paisley. The Campbells had two daughters, Lucy born in 1894 and Edith born in 1895. Mr Campbell's young brother in law also stayed with the family. It was obviously a prosperous home and in addition to the family, the census records a live in cook and domestic servant.

Campbell, Margaret

  • S742
  • Person

Margaret Campbell was born on the 29th of September 1895. She enrolled for one year only in 1917. Her occupation is listed as teacher and her home address is Chapel Outon, Whithorn, Wigtonshire (now a farmhouse B&B). Her term time address was c/o Stewart, 39 Rupert Street. She took an evening class in Drawing and Painting and was assigned to Miss Parkers class.

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Campbell, Margaret A R

  • S1080
  • Person

Margaret A R Campbell Born on 8 July 1900, Margaret enrolled as a day student on the Drawing and Painting class in 1916 and was taught by Miss Jessie R Allan, Instructress in Watercolour. Her home address was 3 Regent Square and she was described as a student. She spent only one year at Art School.

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Campbell, Margaret P

  • P832
  • Person
  • c1875-c1946

Margaret Cameron was born in 1875 or 1876 and studied at GSA between 1891/2 and c1900. Her name appears in the School's Annual Reports in the late 1890s for awards in various subjects. The 1897 Annual Report (for 1895/6 session) records that she received her Art Class Teachers' Certificate and she received her Art Masters' Certificate the following year.

The Annual Report for 1900 records that she had been appointed Art Mistress at the Hamilton Crescent School.

At the GSA Governors AGM on 8 November 1946, the Secretary read a letter from Messrs Biggart Lumsden & Company regarding bequest from late Miss Margaret P Cameron of £100 free of legacy duty to be used to provide a prize ‘given annually to a lady student in training for Art teaching.’ The Margaret P Cameron Prize was first awarded in 1949 although it was first advertised in the prospectus of 1950-1. It began as a cash prize of £2 2s and had increased to £5 5s by 1960. In the early 1980s it was worth £20.

Campbell, Mary Margaret

  • S1486
  • Person

CAMPBELL, Margaret Mary, born 1/4/01. First enrolled as an evening student in Drawing & Painting in 1918/19 (reg. no. 552), her occupation was given as apprentice Tracer and her home address 271 Kilbowie Road, Clydebank. She enrolled again for a further two years (reg. 24 in 1919 and 16 in 1920) following the same evening course. Interestingly, Duncan Campbell of the same address also registered for the Drawing and Painting evening class in in 1918/19, but only appears to have studied for one year. Only the year of his birth, 1887, was recorded and his occupation was given as engineer. Unfortunately it has not been possible to identify the birth certificates of either student, but it seems likely they were siblings. It is also possible they were husband and wife, though married woman students usually had 'Mrs' recorded against their name.

Campbell, Robert

  • P834
  • Person
  • fl 1917-1918

Robert Campbell enrolled as a day student at the Glasgow School of Art in 1917. He studied Drawing and Painting under the tutelage of William Somerville Shanks, who taught at GSA for twenty nine years.

Campbell's address was recorded as Drumpark Farm, Bargeddie (Ballieston).

Campbell, Robert

  • S741
  • Person

Robert Campbell was born on the 26 February 1901. He enrolled at The Glasgow School of Art for one year only (registration number 391) in 1917 studying Drawing and Painting as a day student. His home address appears to be Wranpark Farm, Bargeddie, Lanarkshire. No term time address is recorded, so he may have travelled into Glasgow each day.

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Campbell, Roslyn

  • S777
  • Person

Roslyn Campbell studied Textiles at GSA from 1976. She designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

Campbell, Steven

  • P357
  • Person
  • 1953-2007

Steven Campbell studied Drawing & Painting at The Glasgow School of Art, graduating in 1982 with a Fulbright Scholarship which he used to travel to New York. His first solo show was held at the Barbara Toll Gallery in 1983, and he quickly became well-known. Campbell returned to live in Glasgow in 1986, and emerged as the leading figure of a group of Scottish figurative painters known collectively as 'The New Glasgow Boys'. The group consisted of Campbell alongside fellow GSA alumni Ken Currie, Peter Howson and Adrian Wiszniewski. Campbell's distinctive painting style often has a surreal and mysterious quality, alongside a strong literary element and recurring motifs such as skulls, birds, and the paisley pattern. His work is held in collections such as the Tate and National Galleries of Scotland, and his last major exhibition was 'The Caravan Club' in 2002, at the Talbot Rice Gallery in Edinburgh. He died on 15 August 2007.

Campion, Sister

  • S674
  • Person

Sister Campion first registered at the Glasgow School of Art in 1914, when her address was recorded as Notre Dame Training College, Dowanhill. She does not appear on the roll for the following year, but re-registered in 1916, 1917 and 1918 joining the metalwork course for each of the four years she spent at the School. For at least two of these years, she was taught by a Mr Davidson, presumabley Peter Wylie Davidson, Assistant Master of Decorative Art and Metalwork, member of staff from 1897 - 1934/5.

Notre Dame Training College opened in 1895, the first (female) Catholic Teacher Training College in Scotland and Dowanhill School two years later. The rapid expansion of the school meant that a new chapel and further buildings were soon required. It is possible that in addition to teaching duties, Sisiter Campion may have produced decorative items for the school. Another nun, Sister Callista (see separate entry) studied alongside her. Notre Dame School continues to teach girls of secondary school age in the West End of Glasgow. It is the only single sex comprehensive school in Scotland.

Sources: Notre Dame School website; Wikipedia; Buildings at Risk Register/Historic Environment Scotland.

Campistron, Dominique

  • P762
  • Person
  • fl 2017

Dominique Campistron graduated in Communication Design from The Glasgow School of Art in 2017. In 2017 she was awarded the inaugural Kerry Aylin Prize for Distinction in Print.

Cant, Agnes Bennett

  • S744
  • Person

Agnes Bennett Cant was born on the 1st of December 1894. She enrolled at The Glasgow School of Art for one year only in 1918-1919 to follow an unspecified evening class. Her occupation is given as a teacher and her home address is listed as 10 Weirwood Park, Ballieston.

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Cant, Christine

  • S778
  • Person

Christine Cant studied at GSA in the 1970s and is credited with the make up for the 1978 fashion show.

Christine has worked in hair and make-up for film and television for over 35 years and in 2016 received the BAFTA for Outstanding Contribution to Craft.

Sources: BAFTA https://tinyurl.com/y7cmycer; The Call Sheet https://tinyurl.com/y8vpbby8

Carlile, David McA

  • S193
  • Person

David McAusland Carlile was born in Paisley on the 2nd February 1885 to James Carlile, a spirit merchant, and Helen Polson Carlile (née McAusland), a powerloom weaver. He studied architecture at The Glasgow School of Art from 1905 to 1910. He later emigrated to Canada where he worked as an architect. In 1915 he enlisted with the Canadian Oversees Expeditionary Forces, and fought oversees in the Canadian Royal Highlanders regiment. He died in Montreal on the 4th December 1970, age 85. David McAusland Carlile is listed on The Glasgow School of Art's World War One Roll of Honour.

If you have any more information, please get in touch.

Sources: Library and Archives Canada (http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca).

Carlisle, Elsie May

  • S745
  • Person

Mrs Elsie May Carlisle was born on the 20th of October 1882. She enrolled for the 1916-1917 session at The Glasgow School of Art as a day student studying Life Drawing. Her address is listed as 144 Cambridge Drive, Kelvinside. In the column used to record her local authority, the entry reads 'England'. This is rare, as of the 585 students who attended the School in 1916-1917 only four came from England and Wales. In the same year there were three Belgian students, a reflection of the number of Belgian refugees in Britain at that time. Elsie's married status and the fact she was older than the majority of contemporary students would also have caused her to stand out from the crowd.

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Carlyle, William

  • S746
  • Person

William Carlyle was born in New Galloway, Kirkcudbright on the 13th of April 1896. He was the middle son of Joseph, a Jeweller and Watchmaker born in 1848 and Agnes (nee Lockerbie). He first enrolled at The Glasgow School of Art as an evening student studying Design in 1915 with a registration number of 231. The student registers record his occupation as "silver engraver" and his Glasgow address as c/o Stirling, 82 Alexandra Parade. A second address, High Street, New Galloway, was the family home and possibly also the business address of his father. He enrolled again for the next two years. In 1916-1917 he studied an evening class in Drawing and Painting with a registration number of 18. In 1917-1918 he studied Life Drawing with a registration number of 315. For both years, he continued to give Alexandra Parade as his Glasgow address. After a year's break, he returned in 1919-1920 to study Drawing and Painting again, but had moved to c/o Miss Fisher, 58 Buccleuch Street. He married Grace Young Louden on the 17th of January 1935 in Glasgow and died in Perth on the 3rd of September 1952.

If you have any additional information please get in touch.

Resources used: http://www.ancestry.co.uk

Carmichael, Catherine

  • P618
  • Person
  • fl c1980s

Catherine Carmichael studied at The Glasgow School of Art during the 1980s.

Carmichael, D A

  • S194
  • Person

David Arthur Carmichael was born in Greenock on 5th June 1890, one of seven children of Nina Jane Isabella Carmichael (nee Arthur) and Thomas Carmichael, a shipowner underwriter. Carmichael, an architect's apprentice, attended The Glasgow School of Art from 1909 to 1914 as a student of architecture and was taught by Professor Bourdon and Professor McGibbon. According to the Dictionary of Scottish Architects, he served his apprenticeship at Salmon, Son & Gillespie in Greenock. He then worked as a draughtsman and was admitted to the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1915. During the First World War, Lieutenant Carmichael served in the 7th and 9th battalions and 25th battalion Machine Gun Corps of the Royal Fusiliers. He was reported killed in action at Croix du Bac (Armentières) in April 1918. Carmichael is commemorated on The Glasgow School of Art's First World War Roll of Honour and at Tyne Cot Memorial Cemetery in Belgium.

If you have any more information, please get in touch.

Sources: Scotland's People: http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk, Ancestry: http://www.ancestry.co.uk; Commonwealth War Graves Commission: http://www.cwgc.org; Dictionary of Scottish Architects: http://www.scottisharchitects.org.uk; Inverclyde's Great War: http://www.inverclydeww1.org.

Carnie, Bruce

  • P630
  • Person
  • fl c1970s-

Bruce Carnie studied Embroidery and Woven Textiles at GSA from 1975 and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show. He was awarded a maintenance scholarship for a further four terms at Glasgow and the Royal Society of Arts Industrial Bursary for Furnishing Textiles, in session 1978-79.
He then received a Masters of Art (Textiles and Fashion) from Manchester Metropolitan University and a PhD in Design (Design Management) from the University of South New Wales (Sydney). He is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA). Bruce has worked as a teacher in several countries including Australia and as a textile designer. As at July 2017, he is a lecturer and programme leader in Textile Design, in the School of Design at the University of Leeds.

Carrick, Elizabeth S

  • S1487
  • Person

Elizabeth S Carrick was born on 3 February, 1895. She enrolled at the Art School in 1915-1916 studying design (reg. 342) and took the same course the following year (reg. 464). For both years, her address was recorded as 13 Crosbie Street, Maryhill. Her occupation was given as 'teacher'. In 1915, 165 students at the School were either art teachers or student teachers in training.

Carrick, James Andrew

  • P190
  • Person
  • 1911-1989

James Andrew Carrick was born on 22 April 1911, the son of James Carrick, architect, of Ayr and his wife Susan Cunningham. He attended Ayr Academy. He commenced his studies at the Glasgow School of Architecture in 1928 and served his apprenticeship with James Miller. In 1930 he spent a month touring England to study ecclesiastical architecture, and in the following year he won the Alexander Thomson travelling studentship in 1931, which he used for a three-month study tour of Rome and Northern Italy two years later; and in 1932 he was runner-up for the Grissell Medal. He obtained his diploma and passed the professional practice exam in summer 1933, enabling him to be admitted ARIBA on 4 December that year, his proposers being Andrew Graham Henderson, John Keppie and James Archibald Morris, an old friend of his father's. By that time he had been assisting in his father's office for over a year. In 1934 he was taken into partnership, the firm's name changing to J & J A Carrick, and in the same year he spent a month studying Greek buildings in Sicily and Southern Italy as Bourdon Memorial Student. The elder Carrick was an excellent Arts and Crafts architect, mainly in an English Tudor-Jacobean idiom close in style to Miller's work. In the younger Carrick's hands the direction of the practice quickly changed, although traditional Arts and Crafts could still be provided according to the tastes of the client. The son was a significant modernist, as can be seen at Gourock and Rothesay Pavilions and to a lesser degree at Ayr Ice Rink, but his career was curtailed by the Second World War. The elder Carrick died in 1940. The younger Carrick served as an officer with the Royal Artillery during the Second World War and resumed practice after the war. He was elected FRIBA in 1953, proposed by Andrew Graham Henderson, William James Smith and William McCrea, at which time he was still practising from Wellington Chambers. He served as President of the Glasgow Institute of Architects from 1958-60 and as President of the RIAS from 1969-71. He retired in 1981 enabling him to spend more time on his leisure pursuits, fishing, golf and gardening. He had a position with the River Doon Fisheries Board, was a keen Rotarian and served for a spell as President of the Ayr Rotary Club as well as being Captain of the Turnberry Golf Club in 1985 and 1986. The practice continued operating in central and southern Scotland until 1982 when it merged with Cowie Torry and Partners and became Carrick Cowie and Torry. The new partnership took over the practice of T K Irving and Partners of Stranraer in 1985 and in 1999 changed its name to Carricks, James Andrew Carrick having died on 23 November 1989 in Ayr County Hospital. He was survived by his wife, Christiana Margaret Waddell, and his son and daughter. He was described by his obituarist as a 'kind man and a good practitioner'.

Carroll, Brian

  • P650
  • Person
  • fl 1980s-

Brian Carroll studied at GSA in the 1980s. He did the Graphic Design for the 1986 fashion show and was involved in its filming. He was awarded the Tom Campbell Memorial Prize for Graphic Design in session 1984-85.
As at July 2017, Brian is a photographer based in Cardiff, with his own company Crimzn. He has won three BAFTA Cymru Awards.

Carroll, Jane

  • S780
  • Person

Jane Carroll studied Textiles at GSA from 1976, and designed garments for the 1978 fashion show.

As at July 2017, she is a director of Design is Central graphics design company, and Spot Specific, which develops mobile apps.

Source: LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com

Carruthers, Colin

  • P651
  • Person
  • fl 1970s-

Colin Carruthers studied Graphic Design at GSA in the 1970s and was a cameraman for the 1978 fashion show. He was awarded a maintenance scholarship for a further year at Glasgow in session 1978-79.

Carson, Andrew

  • S1083
  • Person

Andrew Carson enrolled for two years at the Art School from 1914-15 (reg.28 and 69), studying Drawing and Painting as an evening student. Born on 15 May 1895, his address was listed as 161 West Shamrock Street (very near the Art School) and his occupation, estimating engineer. There is no record of any work he produced.

If you have any more information, please get in touch.

Carswell, Catherine Roxburgh

  • P835
  • Person
  • 1879-1946

Catherine Roxburgh Carswell (née Macfarlane) was a Scottish author, biographer and journalist Her work is now considered an integral part of Scottish women's writing of the early 20th century.

The daughter of a Glasgow merchant, Carswell was educated at the Park School. From 1901 to 1903 she attended classes in English Literature at Glasgow University. She went on to study music at the Schumann Conservatorium in Frankfurt before becoming a reviewer and drama critic at the Glasgow Herald from 1907 until 1915. She then became assistant theatre critic for the Observer.

Carswell married Herbert Jackson in 1903, though this was annulled in 1908. Jackson was a Second Boer War veteran and an artist who suffered paranoid delusions. Thinking he was sterile, he accused Carswell of betraying him when he heard news of her pregnancy and in March 1905 threatened to kill her. He was placed in a mental institution for the rest of his life, being considered too dangerous for release. In 1915 she married Donald Carswell, a colleague from the Glasgow Herald.

Carswell’s first novel, "Open the Door," was published in 1920 and won her a 250-guinea Andrew Melrose Prize. Though not strictly autobiographical, the story of Joanna Bannerman, struggling against the conventions of her evangelical, genteel family in Edwardian Glasgow does resonate with the writers’ own upbringing. Joanna studies at the Art School, and some of the characters in the book appear to be drawn from GSA staff. Carswell would have known many of them; her friend Phyllis Clay was an art student, Carswell attended evening classes there and went on to have relationship with Maurice Grieffenhagen, then Head of Life Classes.

Another novel, "The Camomile" followed two years later then a notable biography, "The Life of Robert Burns" in 1930 which upset many Burns traditionalists. She was a close friend of DH Lawrence, and in 1932 she published, "The Savage Pilgrimage: a Narrative of DH Lawrence". She went on to work with Lady Tweedsmuir, widow of John Buchan, producing a two volume biography of the author.

Carswell died of pleurisy aged 66. Her son John edited her fragmentary autobiographical texts and published them in 1950 as "Lying Awake: An Unfinished Autobiography".

Carswell, Jack J

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John Jamieson Carswell (known as Jack) was born on 12th April 1889 in Lansdowne Crescent, Glasgow to Flora (nee McDougall) and John Carswell senior, a physician and surgeon. John was the youngest of three children, with an older brother and sister, Donald and Isabella. The family later moved to Royal Crescent in Glasgow. In 1909, Carswell commenced his studies at The Glasgow School of Art, taking evening classes in architecture whilst working as an architectural apprentice. In February 1913, he was listed as a passenger on the White Star ship, the Baltic, returning to Liverpool from Africa. During WW1, Carswell served as Second Lieutenant with Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 10th Battalion which was formed at Hamilton in September 1914 and came under orders of the 46th Brigade, 15th (Scottish) Division. After initial billeting in the south of England, the Division landed in Boulogne on 10 July 1915. The 15th (Scottish) Division served with distinction on the Western Front, taking part in most of the significant actions, including the Battle of Loos in 1915 where Carswell was killed in action on 25 September 1915. The Battle of Loos was the first large scale British offensive of WW1, with an attack of six Divisions and at the time was referred to as the big push. The battle is also known for the first recorded British use of poison gas. On 25th September, the day Carswell was killed, it is recorded that the 15th Division had only 200 yards to cross to the German trenches. Gas and smoke gave them cover for the first 40 yards but when they emerged the advancing line was hit by German machine guns causing many casualties. Carswell was posthumously awarded the Victory Medal, the British Medal and the 14-15 Star and is commemorated at Loos Memorial. Jack J. Carswell is also commemorated on The Glasgow School of Art's First World War Roll of Honour. Also appears on the Glasgow Institute of Architects Roll of Honour (Student).

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Sources: Scotland's People: http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk; Ancestry: http://www.ancestry.co.uk, ; CWGC: http://www.cwgc.org; The Long Trail: http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk

Carswell, Jean M

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Jean M Carswell was born on 7 February, 1901 and enrolled for the 1917-18 session (reg. 461), giving her home adddress as Auchinloch Farm, Auchinloch by Bonnybridge. She attended as a day student studying Design and her entry shows that one of her teachers was Mr Nicholas, Assistant Professor, who took the Preparatory Design class. In 1918-19 she followed the same course (reg 215) but a '3' is recorded against her entry for day attendance - possibly she only attended for three days a week.

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Cassells, Mary J

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Cassells, Mary J, born 29 May 1901. First enrolled (no. 265) at the Art School for the 1918 – 19 session as a day student studying Drawing and Painting. Her address was given as 56 Glencairn Drive in Pollokshields, where she continued to live throughout the rest of her Art School Career. The following year she returned as a day student studying Design , 'needle' recorded against her entry. In 1920 – 21 she enrolled for the Design course again, but a note against her course suggests she attended mornings only. In 1921-22 (student no. 461) she again studied needlework, but afternoons only. It may be that she followed this course as preparation towards qualifying as a Drawing and Craft teacher.

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