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Archival description
Glasgow style With digital objects
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The Descent of Night

Appears in The Magazine, April 1894. 'The central figure is based upon that used in the 1893 design for a diploma for the GSA and like that in 'The Harvest Moon', has wings like an angel. Here, however, she appears naked and her outstretched arms and hair merge and are transformed into barren tree-like forms. These descend to the horizon behind which the sun is gradually disappearing under the feet of the winged figure. From the bottom of the picture, and directly beneath the sun, rises a flight of menacing birds. They are presumably nocturnal birds of prey and they seem to be flying directly towards the viewers. This is one of Mackintosh's earliest uses of this strange bird, which was to become more stylised and to appear in many different forms, in several media in his oeuvre.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Autumn

Bound in volume, The Magazine, November 1894. 'Behind a stylised tree stands another of Mackintosh's mysterious female figures, but this is the first one to appear that is not meticulously drawn. Only the head is shown in any detail, and the shape of the body is hidden by a voluminous cloak from which not even its limbs appear. This figure was to be repeated many times, becoming more and more stereotyped until, with the banners designed for the Turin Exhibition in 1902, the head is the only recognisably human part of a figure with a twelve-foot long, pear shaped torso. In 1895-96, Mackintosh was to develop this drawing into a poster for the Scottish Musical Review (Howarth, p1, 9F). The same cloaked figure appears with similar formal emblems at the ends of the branches of the bush.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

A Pond

Bound in the November 1894 edition of 'The Magazine'. "It must have been something like this watercolour.... that evoked the 'critics from foreign parts' (as reported by Gleeson White in The Studio, pp88-9) to deduce 'the personality of the Misses MacDonald from their works' and see them as 'middle-ages sisters, flat footed, with projecting teeth and long past matrimony... gaunt, unlovely females'. Gleeson White who visited Glasgow to see the Mackintosh group was pleasantly surprised to meet two laughing comely girls scarce out of their teens." (MacLaren Young).

MacNair, Frances Macdonald

Cabbages in an Orchard

From The Magazine, April 1894. The long text by Mackintosh which accompanies this watercolour in The Magazine (reproduced in full in Billcliffe's catalogue) suggests that he had already encountered public hostility to his work, possibly even from fellow students, on the grounds of incomprehensibility.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Tree of Personal Effort

From The Magazine, Spring 1896. Inscribed: The Tree of Personal Effort, The Sun of Indifference, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, January 1895.' The exact meaning of the symbolism of this work, and its companion, 'The Tree of Influence' has eluded all commentators on Mackintosh's early water-colours. The obvious source of the symbolism is nature, and Mackintosh here reaches his most extreme distortion of organic forms.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Dressing Table for Guthrie and Wells

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Designed for Guthrie and Wells, Glasgow. This and others pieces of green stained furniture made by Guthrie and Wells, were collected by William Davidson for his house Gladsmuir and later in Windyhill. Guthrie and Wells, originally founded as a painting and decorating firm by J and W Guthrie, who entered into partnership with Andrew Wells in 1895, played an important role in the history of decor and design in Glasgow. They were the most important of the stained glass studios emerging in Glasgow in the 1890s, supplied furniture, glass, mosaics etc and had a reputation for first class craftsmanship and always employed excellent designers. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Washstand for Guthrie and Wells

Designed for Guthrie and Wells, Glasgow. This and others pieces of green stained furniture made by Guthrie and Wells, were collected by William Davidson for his house Gladsmuir and later in Windyhill. Guthrie and Wells, originally founded as a painting and decorating firm by J and W Guthrie, who entered into partnership with Andrew Wells in 1895, played an important role in the history of decor and design in Glasgow. They were the most important of the stained glass studios emerging in Glasgow in the 1890s, supplied furniture, glass, mosaics etc and had a reputation for first class craftsmanship and always employed excellent designers. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Linen Cupboard for John Henderson

Designed for John Henderson.'One of the earliest surviving pieces with repousse panels, here designed by Mackintosh. Although probably made by cabinet makers such as Guthrie & Wells, it has none of the more traditional mouldings that appear on the commercial bedroom units, probably because Mackintosh was designing directly for a client. The pendant leaf motif at the base was slowly transformed in later pieces, into a characteristic dip in the lower stretcher or apron based upon a favorite Mackintosh motif, the swooping bird.' (Roger Billcliffe). This item was assessed for conversation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access project (2006-2010), and then again in 2018 following the fire in the Mackintosh Building in June 2018.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Linen Cupboard for Gladsmuir

Designed for the nursery, Gladsmuir, Kilmacolm. Probably made by Guthrie & Wells. The wide vertical panels running either side of the back of the cupboard, here terminating in two decorated lugs, are a motif Mackintosh often used in later work. One of Mackintosh's early pieces which William Davidson acquired for his home in his parents' house Gladsmuir before he built Windyhill. Original photos of the Windyhill interiors show it located in the hall.
This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Writing desk for Gladsmuir (Version 3)

This item suffered significant damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.
The majority of this piece of furniture was lost, however a brass repousse panel plus three handles, all damaged, were salvaged and have undergone conservation and consolidation work.The original item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Writing desk for Gladsmuir (Version 6)

This item suffered significant damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.
The majority of this piece of furniture was lost, however a brass repousse panel plus three handles, all damaged, were salvaged and have undergone conservation and consolidation work.The original item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Writing desk for Gladsmuir (Version 1)

This item suffered significant damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.
The majority of this piece of furniture was lost, however a brass repousse panel plus three handles, all damaged, were salvaged and have undergone conservation and consolidation work.The original item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Writing desk for Gladsmuir (Version 2)

This item suffered significant damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.
The majority of this piece of furniture was lost, however a brass repousse panel plus three handles, all damaged, were salvaged and have undergone conservation and consolidation work.The original item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Writing desk for Gladsmuir (Version 5)

This item suffered significant damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.
The majority of this piece of furniture was lost, however a brass repousse panel plus three handles, all damaged, were salvaged and have undergone conservation and consolidation work.The original item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Schoolroom bench for Gladsmuir

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).
Design for Gladsmuir, Kilmacolm. Designed to match the schoolroom tables and bookcase, the thistle motif pierced in the legs being repeated in the leaded glass of the bookcase.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Bookcase for Gladsmuir

Designed for the schoolroom, Gladsmuir, Kilmacolm. The same two metal panels first appear in the design for the fireplace and fender probably intended for Regent Park Square and were repeated in the wardrobe designed for Westdel in 1898. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Writing desk for Gladsmuir (Version 4)

This item suffered significant damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.
The majority of this piece of furniture was lost, however a brass repousse panel plus three handles, all damaged, were salvaged and have undergone conservation and consolidation work.The original item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Writing desk for Gladsmuir (Version 7)

This item suffered significant damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.
The majority of this piece of furniture was lost, however a brass repousse panel plus three handles, all damaged, were salvaged and have undergone conservation and consolidation work.The original item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Leaf of Gold

In 1896 McNair held his first one-man show, an exhibition of pastels at the Gutekunst Gallery, London. Twenty-one works, including this, were displayed in distinctive dark-stained wood frames. McNair had clearly drawn inspiration from Whistler’s exhibition installations, even down to the typesetting of the catalogue. The entry for this work explained, ‘The Fairy is guarding the Leaf of Love from the Witch of Evil who has robbed the Tree of Life of all its other leaves.’

MacNair, James Herbert

Design for the Grand Hall, Glasgow International Exhibition, 1901

The competition, held in 1898, was won by the Glasgow architect James Miller with a considerably more ornate design for a 'bit of Spanish baroque confectionery' (McLaren Young). Like Miller's, Mackintosh's design derives from James Sellars' for the 1888 Glasgow exhibition, but simplified. 'The dome, perhaps a prerequisite for Glasgow exhibitions, remained, but it was presented with severe geometricality, with an Art Nouveau lantern surmounted by a Chinese coolie hat.'

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Card table for Argyle Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Designed for Argyle Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. A very similar table with a square top was also used in the Argyle Street Tea Rooms, and a white version appears in Annan's photograph of Mackintosh's drawing room in Mains Street. Top repaired and repolished 1985. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Photograph Album containing photographs of "The Immortals"- Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Margaret and Frances Macdonald, Herbert MacNair, Jessie Keppie and others (Part 4 - Version 1)

Back Row: Frances Macdonald
Middle Row L-R: Margaret Macdonald, Katherine Cameron, Janet Aitken, Agnes Raeburn, Jessie Keppie, John Keppie
Front Row L-R: Herbert MacNair, Charles Rennie Mackintosh

Not available / given

Fairies

Mackintosh's style here is the closest he came to that of Margaret and Frances Macdonald, but his figures are always more substantial and the subject matter less whimsical than theirs.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Domino table for Argyle Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Designed for Argyle Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. At least four examples of this table appear in contemporary photographs of the Smoking and Billiards Rooms at Argyle Street. Some appear in photographs of the Ingram Street Tea Rooms taken in the 1940s - possibly Mackintosh specified them for the Cloister Room but it is more likely that they were taken when the Argyle Street Tea Rooms were closed in 1920. The lower shelves held the cups and plates and unused dominoes of the four players.The GSA originally owned a second example of this table, which was donated to the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1958 by Douglas Percy Bliss, then Director of GSA. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Armchair for Glasgow School of Art

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.

Designed for original board room at Glasgow School of Art. The chairs were designed for the original Board Room in the East wing (now the Mackintosh Room). The Governors never used this room for meetings and it was initially used as a studio while space was short in the half-finished building. When the new Board Room was built in the second phase of the building, Mackintosh designed a more elaborate version of this chair for it, MC/F/61. Six chairs reupholstered in brown horsehair 1985, very similar to the original fabric found on one of the chairs. Two remaining chairs reupholstered in 1986. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

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