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Archival description
Interior design With digital objects
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Trimming of mauve linen

A fabric trimming from a cushion cover, embroidered before the First World War. The cover has pink roses and green foliage embroidered on authentic 'Mackintosh' mauve linen fabric.It is possible that both design and fabric were purchased from Brown and Beveridge, Bath Street, Glasgow.

Not available / given

Fragments of lampshade(s) for Library, Glasgow School of Art (Version 1)

The library was destroyed by fire on 23 May 2014, though many metal and glass fragments from the lights were subsequently salvaged. Originally, and according to Mackintosh’s preparatory sketches, there were thought to be 53 individual lights in the library, each with punched holes in the inner reflectors which allowed light to pass through blue and purple glass. The central array was made up of 12 small canisters attached to the light frame on the ceiling, with eight medium pendants and five large pendants hanging below. There were an additional twelve medium canisters attached to the coffered ceiling both above and below the library balcony, making 24. Originally there were also four additional medium hanging pendants in each of the south and western window bays, though these four lights, and the medium canister in the librarians office, had all been removed before the fire in 2014, meaning there were 48 in the library. This small selection of salvaged lights fragments has been retained as evidence of the fire tragedy. These fragments are also surplus to the needs of Rodney French of Lonsdale and Dutch, Edinburgh who has been tasked with reconstructing the entire set of library lights, whilst reusing as much of the surviving fragments as possible.

Fragments of lampshade(s) for Library, Glasgow School of Art (Version 3)

The library was destroyed by fire on 23 May 2014, though many metal and glass fragments from the lights were subsequently salvaged. Originally, and according to Mackintosh’s preparatory sketches, there were thought to be 53 individual lights in the library, each with punched holes in the inner reflectors which allowed light to pass through blue and purple glass. The central array was made up of 12 small canisters attached to the light frame on the ceiling, with eight medium pendants and five large pendants hanging below. There were an additional twelve medium canisters attached to the coffered ceiling both above and below the library balcony, making 24. Originally there were also four additional medium hanging pendants in each of the south and western window bays, though these four lights, and the medium canister in the librarians office, had all been removed before the fire in 2014, meaning there were 48 in the library. This small selection of salvaged lights fragments has been retained as evidence of the fire tragedy. These fragments are also surplus to the needs of Rodney French of Lonsdale and Dutch, Edinburgh who has been tasked with reconstructing the entire set of library lights, whilst reusing as much of the surviving fragments as possible.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 6)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Coat of Arms for the stairwell at Glasgow School of Art (Version 8)

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 15th June 2018. The bell is all that remains.

The symbols which form the Glasgow coat of arms all refer to miracles performed by St. Mungo, the patron saint of the city who is normally represented with these emblems on the coat of arms. They first appeared on the seals of bishops of Glasgow, the fish on the seal of William Wishart in 1270, the bird on the seal of Robert Wishart in 1271. They were used together for the first time on the seal of the Chapter of Glasgow in 1488. The salmon with the ring in its mouth refers to the story of the local Queen who gave her ring to a knight she was in love with, the jealous King stole the ring from the knight while he was asleep and then demanded it back from the Queen, having thrown it into the Clyde. In desperation she prayed to St. Mungo who told his followers to cast their fishing nets in the river and bring him the first fish that they caught, a salmon with the Queen's ring in its mouth. The tree represents the green hazel twig which Mungo restored to life after his companions had killed it. The bell represents the service bell used in Mungo's church and still in Glasgow until c1700. Mackintosh's tree is highly abstract in its Art Nouveau 'whiplash' spirals untypical of his work. The bird is a modern replacement of the stolen original.

Writing desk for Gladsmuir (Version 4)

This item suffered significant damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.
The majority of this piece of furniture was lost, however a brass repousse panel plus three handles, all damaged, were salvaged and have undergone conservation and consolidation work.The original item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Writing desk for Gladsmuir (Version 7)

This item suffered significant damage in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014.
The majority of this piece of furniture was lost, however a brass repousse panel plus three handles, all damaged, were salvaged and have undergone conservation and consolidation work.The original item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Meister Der Innen-Kunst - Title Page from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 4 South Elevation from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.Muthesius in his introduction to the 'Meister der Innen Kunst' portfolio, stresses the impact and novelty of Mackintosh's design. 'The exterior architecture of the building... exhibits an absolutely original character, unlike anything else known... The mass of the building consists of a large plain black, without any breaking up of the walls, the effect being sought for in unbroken uniform surfaces... the windows have the appearance of accidental openings deeply recessed in the walls... Ornament, save in two or three places, is conspicuously absent, all allurements being sternly repressed in order that the desired effect of plainness reticence and therewithal of mystery and height, might be revealed as strongly as possible.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 8 Reception Room from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection. One of the three interior perspectives which Mackintosh omitted from his original submission and consequently was disqualified from the competition, but later supplied to the publishers. They differ in some detail from the elevations already submitted, the arrangements of the lighting is simpler, the stencilled panels at the window are more elaborate and positioned within the recess, next to the windows, rather than on the walls between each recess. The perpendicular stress of the two rows of tapering square standard down each wall is reinforced by the extremely high backs of the chairs and the original light fittings, 'four small square lanterns, each hangings by four cords, so that the whole effect is of a forest of perpendiculars' (Muthesius). As in the dining room it is evident that (probably because of lack of time) Mackintosh drew on furniture designs he had already used in Glasgow: the high backed chairs are very similar to those designed for the Ingram Street Tea Rooms. The most prominent feature of the room is the piano. Muthesius comments on the frequent juxtaposition in the work of the Glasgow School of 'masculine' hard perpendicular structural lines and 'feminine' flowing decorative curves, exemplified in this design. 'Straight lines, especially perpendicular ones, are exalted into a principle, and are carried so far as to be almost spiritualised... Any outbreak of softness is scourged off the field by an exotic multiplication of perpendiculars...This masculine art... also has a feminine side... seen in the panels... which, appearing in a stiff architectural framing, mark an interesting reaction in the direction of sublimated effeminacy...The human figure appears to be regarded as material merely for indulging a taste for soft flowing lines. At need it is impossibly lengthened out or otherwise altered... it is cramped into all sorts of strange positions in order to help out a required note in the decoration.'

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 9 Music Room with Piano & Fireplace from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection. When the dividing partition between the reception and music rooms was removed, these two elevations would have faced each other. The piano with its fantastic superstructure, is on of Mackintosh's most elaborate inventions, based on the organ at Craigie Hall (Roger Billcliffe). 'This instrument is before everything else a piece of decorative art, and is designed to match the rest of the room... four tall corner posts, crowned with groups of figures and reaching to the ceiling, form a sort of baldachin round it. The front is composed of an oval framework containing a tall thin female figure flanked by roses, with a pair of doves meeting overhead. This fanciful composition is supported artistically by two large decorative panels on the walls on either side of the piano, representing two highly spiritualised Astarte-like figures.' (Muthesius). The large projecting fireplace on the opposite wall is a more elaborate version of that in the Mains Street drawing room. Its decoration consists principally of a pair of tall upright candelabra; the inlaid panels above are by Margaret Macdonald.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 11 The Bedroom from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection. The only design for the bedroom, this elevation shows the furniture arranged along one wall, a pair of fixed wardrobes, a fireplace and a washstand in a recess. The uncompromising plainness of the furniture is relieved by stencilled panels. The deadline of 25 March 1901 for the competition suggests that this design is earlier than that for the main bedroom at Windyhill, where the same features were used, with minor differences in the stencilling.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Plate 13 The Dining Room Sideboard from Portfolio of Prints

An Art-Lover's house competition. Portfolio published 1902. In 1901 the Zeitschrift fur Innen-Dekoration of Darmstadt organised an international competition for the design of an Art Lover's House. The 1st prize was shared among 16 entrants, Baillie Scott recieved 2nd prize and 3rd prizes were also awarded. Mackintosh's entry was disqualified as his interior drawings were not finished in time for the competition deadline, but when they arrived he was awarded a special purchase prize of 600 marks by the publishers. The original drawings cannot now be traced, but in 1902 Alexander Koch published them as a portfolio in 'Meister Der Innenkunst' with an introduction by Herman Muthesius. A portfolio was presented by Mackintosh to the GSA and a 2nd set of prints, framed, is in the GSA collection.In his perspective drawing of the dining room, Mackintosh altered the detailing of the sideboard.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Wall hanging designed for The Dug-Out, Willow Tea Rooms, Glasgow

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. The canvas relates to smaller watercolours in the Hunterian collection, formerly thought to be textile designs, and to their painted canvas, 'The Little Hills' by Margaret Macdonald. It is likely that they were intended for 'The Dug-Out', though it is not known whether they were ever installed there. Jessie Newbery recalled in 1933, that 'He (Mackintosh) and his wife spent the winter of 1914 painting two large decorations for Miss Cranston'. This would have been in Suffolk, after they had left Glasgow. Although The Dug-Out was not created till 1917-18 it is not unlikely that Miss Cranston was considering the project some years earlier. The canvas was found in the GSA in a single roll in 1981 and was cleaned and mounted on two stretchers.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Washstand for Guthrie and Wells

Designed for Guthrie and Wells, Glasgow. This and others pieces of green stained furniture made by Guthrie and Wells, were collected by William Davidson for his house Gladsmuir and later in Windyhill. Guthrie and Wells, originally founded as a painting and decorating firm by J and W Guthrie, who entered into partnership with Andrew Wells in 1895, played an important role in the history of decor and design in Glasgow. They were the most important of the stained glass studios emerging in Glasgow in the 1890s, supplied furniture, glass, mosaics etc and had a reputation for first class craftsmanship and always employed excellent designers. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Linen Cupboard for John Henderson

Designed for John Henderson.'One of the earliest surviving pieces with repousse panels, here designed by Mackintosh. Although probably made by cabinet makers such as Guthrie & Wells, it has none of the more traditional mouldings that appear on the commercial bedroom units, probably because Mackintosh was designing directly for a client. The pendant leaf motif at the base was slowly transformed in later pieces, into a characteristic dip in the lower stretcher or apron based upon a favorite Mackintosh motif, the swooping bird.' (Roger Billcliffe). This item was assessed for conversation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access project (2006-2010), and then again in 2018 following the fire in the Mackintosh Building in June 2018.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Domino table for Argyle Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Designed for Argyle Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. At least four examples of this table appear in contemporary photographs of the Smoking and Billiards Rooms at Argyle Street. Some appear in photographs of the Ingram Street Tea Rooms taken in the 1940s - possibly Mackintosh specified them for the Cloister Room but it is more likely that they were taken when the Argyle Street Tea Rooms were closed in 1920. The lower shelves held the cups and plates and unused dominoes of the four players.The GSA originally owned a second example of this table, which was donated to the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1958 by Douglas Percy Bliss, then Director of GSA. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Domino table for the Chinese Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010). Designed for the Blue or Chinese Room at the Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. The fretted back and side rails match the Chinese style motifs of the Blue Room (as called in the job books). Much of the woodwork in the Chinese Room was painted bright blue or red, but there is no trace of any finish having been applied to these chairs other than the ebonising which most of them still display. These chairs have always been associated with the Chinese Room and so must be identified with the entry for thirty-six in the job books (Roger Billcliffe). All the chairs rwere eupholstered in blue horsehair in 1985. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Chair for Ingram Street Tea Rooms

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010).
Designed for the Oak Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms, Glasgow. Probably designed to provide the basic seating unit in the Oak Room. An unusual design for Mackintosh in that it is a very strong chair and now used in the Glasgow School of Art library. These were introduced by the School into the library c.1950 as a replacement for the more fragile windsor chairs originally designed for the room. The chamfering along the back-rails of the chair anticipates the similar waggon-chamfering on the library balustrade. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Windsor chair for the Library, Glasgow School of Art

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Designed for the Library at Glasgow School of Art. This item was assessed for conservation in 2010 as part of the Mackintosh Conservation and Access Project (2006-2010). A more elegant version of the windsor chairs designed for the Dutch Kitchen at Argyle Street (Billcliffe 1906.49). These chairs proved much too delicate for their original purpose; only eight of approximately forty have survived, and all of these have had to be reinforced. They were replaced in the GSA Library c1950 by the much sturdier chairs originally designed for the Ingram Street Tea Rooms, MC/F/67. The Ingram Street Tea Rooms were purchased by Glasgow Corporation in 1951 for £25,000 and were then rented out as various shops and warehouses.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

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