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The Glasgow School of Art Paintings (visual works)
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A Pond

Bound in the November 1894 edition of 'The Magazine'. "It must have been something like this watercolour.... that evoked the 'critics from foreign parts' (as reported by Gleeson White in The Studio, pp88-9) to deduce 'the personality of the Misses MacDonald from their works' and see them as 'middle-ages sisters, flat footed, with projecting teeth and long past matrimony... gaunt, unlovely females'. Gleeson White who visited Glasgow to see the Mackintosh group was pleasantly surprised to meet two laughing comely girls scarce out of their teens." (MacLaren Young).

MacNair, Frances Macdonald

Art, Design and Architecture collection

  • NMC
  • Collection
  • 13th century to early 21st century

Artworks, design pieces and architectural designs related to Glasgow School of Art staff and students.

Items include

  • oil paintings
  • ilk screen prints
  • lithograph prints
  • prints
  • photographs
  • sketches
  • sketch books
  • drawings
  • watercolours
  • collage
  • metalwork, sculpture and ceramics.

Almost all works are by former students and staff or figures related to the history of The Glasgow School of Art. The earliest pieces date from the 16th century and later examples have been purchased from recent Degree Shows. The work is in a variety of media and includes drawings, paintings, prints, sketchbooks, furniture and sculpture. Artists represented include many key figures and the most influential and successful students.

There are also several works from former tutors including Neil Dallas Brown, David Donaldson and Fred Selby, alongside contemporary works by students, donated or purchased at degree show. Key works include those by: Maurice Greiffenhagen, Francis Newbery, John Quinton Pringle, Benno Schotz, Ian Fleming and James D Robertson. Suites of note include large collections of Joan Eardley sketches and paintings, Joan Palmer prints, and architectural drawings by Eugene Bourdon.

Not available / given

Artworks

Artworks, primarily on paper.

Includes GSA student work such as sketchbooks and loose sketches, collages and textile samples.

Fraser Taylor student sketches and collages for various student projects experimenting with media. Collages of preparatory designs for printed textiles of various media including layers of tissue papers, glassine paper, foam pieces, tracing paper with crayon, inks, dyes and mono print. Textile samples of figure studies with gouache paint, ink and collage areas in various medium. Designs for printed textiles in acrylic and pen on paper with areas of collage. Sketches of landscape and figure studies, pencil, charcoal, chalk, crayon, glue, acrylic and watercolour on paper. With hand written titles, dates and notes. 44 sheets various dimensions varying from 296 x 210 mm to 740 x 555 mm. Some mounted on card. The items are very fragile with
some collage elements, flaking of the friable media such as gouache and acrylic paints.

Some of this material was damaged in the fire in GSA's Mackintosh Building on 23rd May 2014. Paper conservation took place in 2018. Textile conservation was completed in 2019.

Taylor, Fraser

Associated Works

This collection includes works by a number of artists, designers and architects associated with Charles Rennie Mackintosh, including his wife Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh, his sister-in-law Frances Macdonald MacNair and his sister-in-law's husband Herbert MacNair. These works include textiles, designs, and four volumes of a Glasgow School of Art student publication called The Magazine, as well as several individual watercolours now separated from the publication. The collection also includes a number of models for proposed architectural schemes by Mackintosh.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Autumn

Bound in volume, The Magazine, November 1894. 'Behind a stylised tree stands another of Mackintosh's mysterious female figures, but this is the first one to appear that is not meticulously drawn. Only the head is shown in any detail, and the shape of the body is hidden by a voluminous cloak from which not even its limbs appear. This figure was to be repeated many times, becoming more and more stereotyped until, with the banners designed for the Turin Exhibition in 1902, the head is the only recognisably human part of a figure with a twelve-foot long, pear shaped torso. In 1895-96, Mackintosh was to develop this drawing into a poster for the Scottish Musical Review (Howarth, p1, 9F). The same cloaked figure appears with similar formal emblems at the ends of the branches of the bush.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

Cabbages in an Orchard

From The Magazine, April 1894. The long text by Mackintosh which accompanies this watercolour in The Magazine (reproduced in full in Billcliffe's catalogue) suggests that he had already encountered public hostility to his work, possibly even from fellow students, on the grounds of incomprehensibility.

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

David Donaldson and the 2nd Year Class, Back Studio, GSA, 42

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Study of GSA art students, including Dorothy Ballantyne, Marion Fletcher, Sheila Wilson, Tom Gardner (the artist), Jimmy Spiers, Audrey Scarle, Florence Jamieson, Fay Campbell as well as tutor David Donaldson, his wife Pat and son David, plus a life model who is thought to be a music student from Falkirk who studied at The Atheneum.

Gardner, Tom

Lunch, Original Refectory, GSA 42/43

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. GSA students and staff featured in this work include (from left to right), amongst others: Harry McLean, GSA student and conservator (seated at table bottom left, resting elbow on table); Hugh Adam Crawford, GSA staff, Drawing and Painting department (standing, front-facing, slightly left of centre); Joan Eadley, GSA student and artist (centre, standing, facing left); John Miller, GSA staff, Drawing & Painting department (slightly right of centre, facing right, carrying portfolio under right arm); Margot Sandeman, GSA student and artist (slightly right of centre, facing right, arms folded, in conversation with Cordelia Oliver); Cordelia Oliver, GSA student, art critic and journalist (slightly right of centre, facing left, in conversation with Margot Sandeman); Margaret McGavin, GSA student and artist (right of centre, adjacent to Cordelia Oliver, front-facing but looking right, in conversation with another female student); David Donaldson, GSA staff, Drawing and Painting department (right of centre, left-facing, positioned between Margaret McGavin and the female student she is talking to); Benno Schotz, GSA staff, Modelling and Sculpture department and sculptor (right hand side, facing left); Timothy Powell, GSA staff, Graphic Design department (right hand side, in the foreground, front-facing, wearing a suit).

Gardner, Tom

Museum, The Glasgow School of Art

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. This painting of the first-floor museum, looking East, is one of the very earliest artistic depictions of the building's celebrated interior.

Anderson, Elizabeth

Papers of James Cosgrove

  • DC 111
  • Collection
  • 1968-2020

Collection includes artworks and sketchbooks made by Jimmy Cosgrove as a student at the Glasgow School of Art; while working as a Tutor and the Director of the Glasgow School of Art; and afterwards, including work relating to the House for an Art Lover, and documenting travels across Europe, North America, and Mexico.

Cosgrove, James

Papers of Jane Richards and Fiona Jean Paton, students of The Glasgow School of Art

  • DC 083
  • Collection
  • c1908-1980s

This collection relates to Jane Richards and her granddaughter Fiona Jean Paton who both studied at The Glasgow School of Art.

It includes:

  • An artist’s palette owned by Jane Richards, c1910
  • a small box of watercolour paints owned by Jane Richards, early 20th century
  • a portrait drawn by Jane Richards, c1908-1910
  • a photograph of Jane Richards, c1914-1918
  • a photograph of Jane Richards' husband in uniform, c1914-18
  • two watercolour landscapes by Jane Richards, 1907 and 1911
  • even prints produced by The Dux Engraving Co Ltd, early 20th century
  • two portraits drawn by Robert Eadie, c1909
  • three sketchbooks for product design furniture by Fiona Jean Paton, early 1980s
  • eight photographs and eleven slides relating to product design furniture, early 1980s.

Please note that this material is not yet fully catalogued and therefore some items may not be accessible to researchers.

One item was damaged in the fire in GSA's Mackintosh Building on 23rd May 2014 and was conserved in 2018-19.

Richards, Jane

Poster for an exhibition of work by John O'Connor

This poster advertised two exhibitions happening coherently at The Glasgow School Of Art in early 1977. The main feature was an exhibition of work by John O'Connor which was held in the Mackintosh Museum and featured pieces in a variety of mediums including drawing, painting, wood-engraving, graphics and illustration. O'Connor spent a brief period lecturing at The Glasgow School Of Art in the graphic design department from 1978 to 1979. The second exhibition was entitled 'The National Book League Exhibition Of Book Design and Production' and was held in the Mackintosh Library. A duplicate of this poster can be found under reference number GSAA/EPH/10/193.

Not available / given

Students on Leave, GSA, 43

This item was lost in the fire in The Mackintosh Building at The Glasgow School of Art on 23rd May 2014. Those depicted include Danny Ferguson, Gordon Huntly, Lewis Allan, Eileen Allen, Joan Docherty, Molly Brown and Ishbel Macdonald.

Gardner, Tom

The Building Committee of the Board of Governors of The Glasgow School of Art

Portrait group. Inscribed on frame: "Mr. Charles. R. Mackintosh FRIBA The Architect/Col. R.J.Bennett V.D./Mr. David Barclay FRIBA/Sir Francis Powell, LLD, PRSW/Mr. John Munro FRIBA/Mr. Patrick S. Dunn - Convener/Councillor J. Mollison, MINA/ Mr. Hugh Reid DL/ Sir Wm Bilsland, Bart. LLD, DL/Sir John J. Burnet, RSA, FRIBA, LLD/Mr. John Henderson MA/Sir James Fleming - Chairman of Governors/Mr. John M. Groundwater - secretary/ Mr. Francis H. Newbery CAV OFF, INT, SBC, ARCA - Director, pinxit". When Newbery exhibited this group at the Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts in 1913 it did not include the figure of Mackintosh. In 1914 he painted his large portrait of Mackintosh (collection: Scottish National Portrait Gallery) and his Building Committee portrait group was offered to the Board and accepted. When it was unveiled in 1914 it was seen that he had added Mackintosh's figure, a smaller version of his individual portrait, to the left of the group, and redated the whole canvas 1914. Painting cleaned and relined in 1963 by Mr Harry McLean who discovered the late addition of the figure of Mackintosh.

Newbery, Francis Henry

The Descent of Night

Appears in The Magazine, April 1894. 'The central figure is based upon that used in the 1893 design for a diploma for the GSA and like that in 'The Harvest Moon', has wings like an angel. Here, however, she appears naked and her outstretched arms and hair merge and are transformed into barren tree-like forms. These descend to the horizon behind which the sun is gradually disappearing under the feet of the winged figure. From the bottom of the picture, and directly beneath the sun, rises a flight of menacing birds. They are presumably nocturnal birds of prey and they seem to be flying directly towards the viewers. This is one of Mackintosh's earliest uses of this strange bird, which was to become more stylised and to appear in many different forms, in several media in his oeuvre.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie

The Magazine

There are 4 known surviving volumes: The Magazine 1893, The Magazine April 1894, The Magazine November 1894, The Magazine 1896.

The Magazine was a publication of original writings and designs by students from the Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland, and their friends. Appearing in 4 volumes between November 1893 and Spring 1896, The Magazine contains text from contributors handwritten by Lucy Raeburn, editor, accompanied by original illustrations. These volumes are the only known copies of The Magazine. In addition to rare, early watercolours and designs by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the volumes contain early designs by Frances MacDonald and Margaret MacDonald, at a stage in their development which has been labelled 'Spook School', and two sets of photographs by James Craig Annan, when he was beginning to establish a reputation at home and abroad. Among other contributors were Janet Aitken, Katherine Cameron, Agnes Raeburn and Jessie Keppie, all of whom enjoyed lengthy careers in art and design.

The Magazine is similar to an album amicorum such as those which originated in the middle of the 16th century among German university students, who collected autographs of their friends and notable persons, sometimes adding coats of arms and illustrations. The Magazine resembled the album amicorum in that contributions were by a close group of students and their friends and is all the more interesting because the illustrations were produced by young people who had a common social background, were trained at the same school, and subjected to the same artistic influences. The contributors were closely linked, some by family, some by romantic attachments and had close social connections. Other contributors include C Kelpie, John M Wilson, Jane Keppie, and Ethel M Goodrich. Source: Jude Burkhauser, Glasgow Girls: women in art and design (Edinburgh : Canongate, 1990) The Magazine has been digitised in its entirety, and is available to search and browse at www.gsathemagazine.net/

Raeburn, Lucy

The Tree of Personal Effort

From The Magazine, Spring 1896. Inscribed: The Tree of Personal Effort, The Sun of Indifference, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, January 1895.' The exact meaning of the symbolism of this work, and its companion, 'The Tree of Influence' has eluded all commentators on Mackintosh's early water-colours. The obvious source of the symbolism is nature, and Mackintosh here reaches his most extreme distortion of organic forms.' (Roger Billcliffe).

Mackintosh, Charles Rennie